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Couple says living on a floating cabin saves a ton of money and is great for their mental health

They saved $27,500 a year overall.

houseboat, floating cabin, tiny homes
@keepingalfoatwiththejoneses/Instagram

Inexpensive and tranquil…what's not to like?

Saving money and living comfortably don’t always go hand in hand, but people do find ways to accomplish it. Sometimes all it takes is thinking a little outside the box—getting a job that allows you to travel the world or swapping out a traditional mortgage for more creative, less costly home ideas.

Take this couple in North Carolina, for example, who gave up living on land to move into a floating cabin and apparently saved $27,500 annually by doing so.

According to Good News Network, Sarah Spiro, 27, and her boyfriend, Brandon Jones, 40, break down the math: Their one-bedroom floating home, which they bought in March 2021, originally cost less than $30,000. The pair then spent two months and $23,000 renovating, for a total initial investment of less than $50,000. And now, they pay $2,500 a year to live on the lake. Yes, you read that right. $2,500 a year. They used to pay that much per month on their combined individual rents.

Obviously, it was a “no brainer,” said Spiro.


If you think this home is not equipped for modern life, guess again. It’s entirely solar powered, has a septic tank that gets pumped out weekly, a wood stove for heat and propane for cooking, a filter to make the lake water drinkable…and yes, it has internet.

Of course, there are some challenges. Winters are quite cold, the nearest grocery store is still 40 minutes away and they can’t get food delivered (imagine a poor DoorDash driver having to rent a paddleboat just to drop off some McDonalds). But still, Spiro and Jones’ floating cabin has worked wonders for their mental health.

“It is so peaceful here. You still have your day-to-day trends like doing the dishes and laundry but you get to do it all in this phenomenal view at all times. Whatever the time, whatever you are doing you are surrounded by peace and serenity—it is paradise," Spiro said according to Good News Network.

So…this is basically like living on a cruise ship for introverts. Genius.

Take a tour inside with the video below:

Spiro and Jone share an Instagram and Youtube account, aptly named @KeepingAfloatWithTheJoneses, where they share helpful tips to anyone else who might want to live that sweet “water rat” lifestyle. You can even follow along to get updates on renting a floating cabin for yourself.

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