Don't you think heat waves suck? 20 photos show how old-timers beat the heat.

Lately it can feel like we've somehow accidentally opened a portal to the heart of the sun.

Pictured: Phoenix, Arizona. Image from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Wikimedia Commons.

Unfortunately, heat waves are getting stronger and more common today, thanks to climate change. According to this article by The Guardian, a third of the world is at risk of dangerous heat waves today. While heat waves are hitting us more frequently now than in the past, 100 years ago people still had to deal with the occasional temperature spike. How did they do it?


The pictures from then show how people coped in ways as surprising as they are relatable.

Here are 20 examples of what I mean:

1. Need ice? That's going to require a little more muscle power than just walking over to your freezer.

Not going to lie, that looks incredibly refreshing. Photo from 1932. Photo from Francis M.R.Hudson/Topical Press Agency/Getty Images.

2. Back then, ice didn't come in plastic bags from a freezer outside 7-Eleven. You had to get it delivered.

August 1911. Photo from Topical Press Agency/Getty Images.

This photo's from 1911, just a couple years before the first electrically-powered home refrigerators hit the scene. Before then, the ice box was literally that — a box kept cool by giant chunks of ice.

3. Of course, once you carry that load of ice in, you have to have a little sit. Sometimes on it. With an ice cream.

Damp shorts are a small price to pay for the most refreshing chair ever. Photo from Fox Photos/Getty Images.

4. At some point, you decide your fashion sense is less important than keeping cool.

It's hard to keep a stiff upper lip when you have the funnies sitting on your head. July 1913. Photo from Topical Press Agency/Getty Images.

5. Wet pants are a small price to pay for a chance to go wading.

A group of girls goes wading into the Serpentine in London's Hyde Park. August 1911. Photo from Topical Press Agency/Getty Images.

6. And everybody's gonna need a hat.

These men are so happy about their hats, it's almost inappropriate. Circa 1928. Photo from Topical Press Agency/Getty Images.

7. Edwardian gentlemen know to act normally even if one is sweltering in a suit and bow tie. For comfort, one may remove one's jacket only.

Aww, yeah. May 1914. Photo from Topical Press Agency/Getty Images.

8. If you've ever lived anywhere super dry, you know all about spraying the driveway to keep the dust down.

1925. Photo from Topical Press Agency/Getty Images.

9. Or taking an extra bath to cool off before bed.

August 1919. Photo from Topical Press Agency/Getty Images

10. Summer is the perfect time to take a day off and hit the beach with your friends.

May 1925. Photo from Topical Press Agency/Getty Images.

11. And everyone else's friends too, apparently.

A beach in Bognor Regis in 1933. Photo from Topical Press Agency/Getty Images.

12. At some point, it's hot enough to ignore the signs and just jump in a public fountain.

1912. Photo from Topical Press Agency/Getty Images

13. And live your whole life in the water.

Circa 1930.  Photo from Hulton Archive/Getty Images

14. Literally — your whole life.

Can't imagine doing that with a Macbook. Circa 1937. Photo from Topical Press Agency/Getty Images.

15. Summer is the time when swimwear becomes daywear then eveningwear.

1929. Photo from Fox Photos/Getty Images.

16. No matter what you're wearing, lounge around in general. It's too damn hot to do anything else.

That is the slump of man who's decided that it's too hot to care anymore. Paris, 1929. Photo from Hulton Archive/Getty Images.

17. Get some sun.

1933. Photo from Topical Press Agency/Getty Images.

18. Of course, in a heat wave, you've got to make sure to watch our for your animal friends too.

May 1936. Photo from E. Dean/Topical Press Agency/Getty Images.

19. Especially if that means letting them join for a dip.

Horses in the Thames. 1935. Photo from David Savill/Topical Press Agency/Getty Images.

20. Or making sure they've got the right accessories.

1928. Photo from Fox Photos/Getty Images.

As the Earth gets warmer, heat waves are likely to increase in both frequency and strength, so take a page from these summer-sun veterans and play it safe.

Drink plenty of water. Keep an eye out for signs of heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Try to do outside chores in the morning or evening, when it tends to be less hot, if you can.

And keep an eye out for tricky reporters and cameras because, who knows, in 100 years, you might end up on a list just like this one.

True

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday are teaming up to find the people who lead with love everyday.

Know someone in your neighborhood who's known for their optimistic attitude, commitment to bettering their community and always leading with love? Tell us about them for the chance to win a $2,000 grant to keep doing good in their community.

Nomination ends November 22, 2020

Sarita Linda Rocco / Facebook

Americans are more interested in politics than ever these days. More voted in the 2020 election than in any other in the past 100 years. Over 65% of the voting-eligible cast a ballot in the contentious fight between Joe Biden and Donald Trump.

"People are very excited and paying attention even though there are all this bad news and high 'wrong track' numbers in the country," Nancy Zdunkewicz, managing editor at Democracy Corps, told The Hill.

It's wonderful to see that a greater number of Americans are standing up to be counted and demanding their voices be heard. But it's also the symptom of a deep level of discontent many people feel about their country.

Keep Reading Show less
True

A lot of people here are like family to me," Michelle says about Bread for the City — a community nonprofit located in Washington DC that provides local residents with food, clothing, health care, social advocacy, and legal services. And since the pandemic began, the need to support organizations like Bread for the City is greater than ever, which is why Amazon is Delivering Smiles to local charities across the country this holiday season.

Watch the full story:

Amazon is giving back by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, and donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Bread for the City provide to those disproportionately impacted this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your charity of choice.
via Stone Gasman / Twitter

While generational stereotypes don't apply to everyone, there are significant differences between how Baby Boomers (1944 to 1964), Gen X (1965 to 1980), and Millenials (1981 to 1996) were raised.

Baby Boomers tended to grow up in homes where one parent stayed home and the other worked outside of the house. Millennials are known for having over-involved "helicopter" parents.

Then, there's Gen X.

The smaller, cooler generation that, according to a 2004 marketing study "went through its all-important, formative years as one of the least parented, least nurtured generations in U.S. history."

Keep Reading Show less

The U.S. Surgeon General credits the new surge in COVID cases to "pandemic fatigue," but it's nothing compared to what healthcare workers on the frontlines are going through. TIME recently reported that nurses are experiencing burnout, but it often goes unseen. A nurse recently employed a social media trend to draw attention to the behind the scenes fatigue.

An ICU nurse posted her own "how it started/how it's going" photo on Twitter, and long story short, it's not going that great. The before photo of Kathryn, an ICU nurse in Nashville, was taken in the middle of April right after she completed nursing school. The after photo revealed just how much literal sweat and tears healthcare workers put in while treating people during the pandemic.


Keep Reading Show less