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Joy

Delivery guy finds a baby turtle and his joy is contagious

The timeline cleanse that everyone needs.

joy; guy finds turtle; happy video; viral video; heartwarming videos

Delivery guy finds baby turtle and his joy is contagious

Even as adults there are some things that make us so giddy with joy that you briefly feel like a kid again. It can be finding a four leaf clover on a walk, a tiny baby kitten or even warm cookies right out of the oven. Anything can give that inner child a chance to show itself but one delivery driver's inner child was captured on doorbell camera.

A FedEx driver had just delivered a package but when he's walking back to his truck he abruptly stops. The man spots something moving in the grass before picking it up to investigate it further. Turns out it was a baby turtle. Not just any baby turtle but one of the tiniest baby turtles you've ever seen and the delivery driver is immediately filled with excitement.

It was truly one of those moments where someone else needs to see what you see to release so of the joy into the atmosphere but there was no one around.


That didn't stop the delivery driver from sharing his glee. He noticed the doorbell camera and took his new baby buddy right up to the camera to show the owners of the house what he found. In the video shared on social media by Bright Side Fun, you can feel the excitement through the camera, commenters felt it too.

"I just saw him turn into a little boy to show off that baby turtle. I love this," one person writes.

"Awww, we think that's cool too! Sometimes it is the little things that get you through the day," another commenter says.

"This made me smile! We’re all big kids at heart that get excited about finding a baby turtle," someone exclaims.

Finding joy in the little things can certainly help you get through the day but watching this video will warm your heart. Check it out below:

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