Mama deer came bounding into a yard when she heard a 5-week-old human baby crying

Mama instincts can be strong, regardless of species. That's why breastfeeders will often have a milk letdown reflex when they hear a baby crying, even if it isn't their own. It's why we get stories of cross-species caregiving when a baby animal gets abandoned. And it's why a video of a mama deer running to a crying human baby's rescue is so endearing. (Please high-five me for not typing "endeering.")

Hanna Burton of New Lexington, Ohio, shared the video on TikTok with the caption "When you almost have to throw down with a momma deer because your baby starts crying outside." The video has been viewed more than 27 million times and liked more than 6 million.

According to Fox 2 KTVU, Burton was hanging out on her deck with her 5-week-old son, Charlie, when the deer encounter occurred. Charlie was lying on fluffy blankets and having some tummy time when he began to get fussy. As Charlie cried and Burton started to console him, a deer came bounding into the yard toward the deck. Burton immediately picked up Charlie, calmly saying, "No, no. This one's my baby. It's not yours."


"Hi, mama!" she added as the deer stopped in her tracks.

"She thinks you're her baby," she said to Charlie.

@hannaburton

When you almost have to throw down with a momma deer because your baby starts crying outside

Burton said that the deer lives nearby with her two fawns and visits their yard frequently. And the commentary on Burton's TikTok share was hilarious:

"She was ready to name that baby Tarzan and raise it on her own."

"She's like, 'Oh you got this? You don't need my help? I'm just gonna hang out over here then.'"

"The fact that your baby understood the assignment and stopped crying.'

"The deer's TikTok is 'when you almost have to throw down with a mama human because you think she stole your baby.'"

"So you're telling me I can use a baby as a deer call?"

The sound of Charlie's crying really does resemble the sound of a fawn crying for help, so it's understandable that the deer would come running to the rescue when she heard it. Such a good mama.

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Shanda Lynn Poitra was born and raised on the Turtle Mountain Reservation in Belcourt, North Dakota. She lived there until she was 24 years old when she left for college at the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks.

"Unfortunately," she says, "I took my bad relationship with me. At the time, I didn't realize it was so bad, much less, abusive. Seeing and hearing about abusive relationships while growing up gave me the mentality that it was just a normal way of life."

Those college years away from home were difficult for a lot of reasons. She had three small children — two in diapers, one in elementary school — as well as a full-time University class schedule and a part-time job as a housekeeper.

"I wore many masks back then and clothing that would cover the bruises," she remembers. "Despite the darkness that I was living in, I was a great student; I knew that no matter what, I HAD to succeed. I knew there was more to my future than what I was living, so I kept working hard."

While searching for an elective class during this time, she came across a one-credit, 20-hour IMPACT self-defense class that could be done over a weekend. That single credit changed her life forever. It helped give her the confidence to leave her abusive relationship and inspired her to bring IMPACT classes to other Native women in her community.

I walked into class on a Friday thinking that I would simply learn how to handle a person trying to rob me, and I walked out on a Sunday evening with a voice so powerful that I could handle the most passive attacks to my being, along with physical attacks."

It didn't take long for her to notice the difference the class was making in her life.

"I was setting boundaries and people were either respecting them or not, but I was able to acknowledge who was worth keeping in my life and who wasn't," she says.

Following the class, she also joined a roller derby league where she met many other powerful women who inspired her — and during that summer, she found the courage to leave her abuser.

"As afraid as I was, I finally had the courage to report the abuse to legal authorities, and I had the support of friends and family who provided comfort for my children and I during this time," she says.

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via Matt Radick / Flickr

Joe Biden reversed Donald Trump's ban on transgender people serving in the military earlier this year, allowing the entire LGBTQ community to serve for the first time.

Anti-gay sentiment in the U.S. military goes as far back as 1778 when Lieutenant Frederick Gotthold Enslin was convicted at court-martial on charges of sodomy and perjury. The military would go on to make sodomy a crime in 1920 and worthy of dishonorable discharge.

In 1949 the Department of Defense standardized its anti-LGBT regulations across the military, declaring: "Homosexual personnel, irrespective of sex, should not be permitted to serve in any branch of the Armed Forces in any capacity, and prompt separation of known homosexuals from the Armed Forces is mandatory."

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