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Bill de Blasio doesn't want you to go to Chick-fil-A. Good thing there are alternatives.

For the most part, Americans love Chick-fil-A.

Back in 2015, it was the most popular fast food restaurant based on customer satisfaction. Not to mention it rakes in billions of dollars every year — all from slinging out chicken sandwiches that have been described as no less than the "pinnacle of human achievement."


New York City's first Chick-fil-A location in Manhattan. Photo by Andrew Renneisen/Getty Images.

Chick-fil-A's success has recently brought the chain to the streets of New York City, where it will soon open a second stand-alone location in Queens.

If New York's mayor has anything to say about it, though, there won't exactly be a line out the door. And you bet he has something to say about it.

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has urged New Yorkers not to eat at Chick-fil-A.

Bill de Blasio. New York City mayor, Giant Man. Photo by Andrew Renneisen/Getty Images.

"What the ownership of Chick-fil-A has said is wrong," De Blasio told reporters, according to DNAinfo. "I’m certainly not going to patronize them and I wouldn’t urge any other New Yorker to patronize them."

What-the-what is he talking about?

In case you don't remember, Chick-fil-A has been at the center of a lot of controversy in regards to the LGBT community.

Here's the condensed version: Chick-fil-A has given millions to anti-LGBT groups since 2003. Chick-fil-A has fired employees who don't adhere to strict Christian standards, including a Muslim man in 2002 who didn't want to participate in a Christian group prayer. Chick-fil-A also has a 0 rating from the Human Rights Campaign.

Oh, and the chain's president, Dan Cathy, has said too many harmful things about the gay community to count. Not to mention, when he was accused of being against gay marriage, his response in 2012 was simply: "Guilty as charged."

Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images.

"This group imparts a strong anti-LGBT message," said De Blasio. "It is outrageous that Chick-fil-A is quietly spreading its message of hate by funding [anti-gay] organizations."

For its part, Chick-fil-A has been working to walk back its anti-gay reputation. Back in February it agreed to stop funding anti-gay organizations after "months of discussion."

When reached for comment on the New York City controversy, a Chick-fil-A spokesperson had this to say:

"New Yorkers have turned out in record numbers since we entered the market last year, and we are thrilled by the strong response. Everyone is welcome, and Chick-fil-A has no political agenda. Our sole focus is on serving great food with fast and remarkable service."

As you'd expect, de Blasio's words have been received with some criticism.

He's been called "anti-Christian" and accused of playing politics, and frankly, it's hard to say if the boycott will work.

On one hand, New Yorkers have a proud history of supporting the LGBT community, and on the other, they also don't like being told what to do.

Photo by Eric Thayer/Getty Images.

I can tell you one thing, though — New York City has practically more food options than people. It has everything!

If it's chicken sandwiches you want, go to Blue Ribbon Fried Chicken, or Parm. Or Fuku! Or any deli on any corner of any street. Why not grab a Chick'n Shack sandwich at Shake Shack. It's really good! You'll only have to wait in line for like ... I don't know ... an hour or two?

Actually, you know what? I live in Queens, why don't you just come over to my place? I'll make you a chicken sandwich that'll blow the pickles right out of your shoes. We can watch "Twin Peaks" or something.

Look, OK, obviously it's up to you if you want to go to Chick-fil-A or not. But just remember: Chick-fil-A might be on the right side of chicken. But they'll always be remembered as the fast food joint on the wrong side of LGBT history.

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