After she was hacked, Olympian Simone Biles opened up about her disorder.

On Sept. 13, 2016, a group of hackers leaked the medical records of some Olympic champions.

The hackers, who call themselves Fancy Bears, were actually Russian espionage agents — at least according to the World Anti-Doping Agency, whose job it is to make sure that athletes aren't pumped full of steroids or nanobots or whatever else might help them cheat.

And, supposedly, these files are the first of many more to come that will expose the athletes who allegedly got away with illegal drug enhancement at the 2016 summer games in Rio.


But the files didn't show what people expected.

Photo by Thomas Coex/AFP/Getty Images.

Simone Biles, a "Final Five" gymnast who won four gold medals at the Rio games, was one of the victims of the hack.

And, as you can imagine, that put her in an awkward spot. Her tremendous display in Rio made her one of the most medaled gymnasts in history, beating the competition at one point with largest margin seen since 2006. And that's without even mentioning the bajillion other awards she's won in her 19 years of life.

But after Fancy Bears revealed that Biles was using "illicit" psychostimulants and amphetamines, her remarkable accomplishments were suddenly called into question. Was she a cheater? Did she actually earn the medals she won? Did she have an unfair advantage?

Photo by Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images.

But it turns out that Simone's "illicit" medications were actually just a standard prescription given to people with a certain disorder:

This wasn't quite the dark, insidious secret people were expecting, but it's still a pretty big deal for folks like me who also have ADHD.

In fact, ADHD affects about 5% of the population — and it tends to manifest differently for women, in particular. Unfortunately, ADHD meds can also be controversial — some people think it's overdiagnosed or think we use it as a way to describe energetic kids with a proclivity for video games and nothing more. Others, like the Fancy Bears hackers, like to point to the chemical similarities between certain ADHD medications and other illicit substances.

Proper treatment for ADHD goes a long way in helping people to succeed, just like Simone Biles.

And for those who are struggling with the shame and stigma around the condition, seeing an Olympic champion open up about ADHD is incredibly inspiring.

If anything, this revelation somehow makes Biles' accomplishments seem even more amazing.

In many ways, she's had to work twice as hard for them.

So congratulations, Simone — on your Olympic victories and on the admirable perseverance that makes you a mental health role model too.

True
Back Market

Between the new normal that is working from home and e-learning for students of all ages, having functional electronic devices is extremely important. But that doesn't mean needing to run out and buy the latest and greatest model. In fact, this cycle of constantly upgrading our devices to keep up with the newest technology is an incredibly dangerous habit.

The amount of e-waste we produce each year is growing at an increasing rate, and the improper treatment and disposal of this waste is harmful to both human health and the planet.

So what's the solution? While no one expects you to stop purchasing new phones, laptops, and other devices, what you can do is consider where you're purchasing them from and how often in order to help improve the planet for future generations.

Keep Reading Show less

My husband and I had just finished watching "The Office" for the third time through and were looking for a new show to watch before bed. I'd seen a couple of friends highly recommend "Schitt's Creek," so we decided to give it a try.

My initial reaction to the first episode was meh. The characters were annoying and the premise was weird (pretentious and previously-filthy-rich family lives in a scuzzy motel in the middle of nowhere??). I felt nothing for the main characters, and I hate shows with horrible main characters that I can't root for. Even predicting that they were going to eventually be transformed by their small town experiences, I didn't see liking them. It didn't grab either of us as worth continuing, so we stopped.

But then I kept hearing people whose taste I trust implicitly talk about how great it was. I know different people have different tastes, but I realized I had to be missing something if these friends of mine raved on and on about it. So we gave it another shot.

It took a bit—I don't know how many episodes exactly, but a bit—to start liking it. Then a bit longer to start really liking it, and then at some point, it became a full-fledged, gushy, where-have-you-been-all-my-life love affair.

So when the show took home nine Emmy awards over the weekend—breaking the record for the most wins in a season for a comedy—I wasn't surprised. Here's why:

Keep Reading Show less
True

$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


The legality of abortion is one of the most polarized debates in America—but it doesn’t have to be.

People have big feelings about abortion, which is understandable. On one hand, you have people who feel that abortion is a fundamental women’s rights issue, that our bodily autonomy is not something you can legislate, and that those who oppose abortion rights are trying to control women through oppressive legislation. On the other, you have folks who believe that a fetus is a human individual first and foremost, that no one has the right to terminate a human life, and that those who support abortion rights are heartless murderers.

Then there are those of us in the messy middle. Those who believe that life begins at conception, that abortion isn’t something we’d choose—and we’d hope others wouldn’t choose—under most circumstances, yet who choose to vote to keep abortion legal.

Keep Reading Show less

Biases, stereotypes, prejudices—these byproducts of the human brain's natural tendency to generalize and categorize have been a root cause of most of humanity's problems for, well, pretty much ever. None of us is immune to those tendencies, and since they can easily slip in unnoticed, we all have to be aware of where, when, and how they impact our own beliefs and actions.

It also helps when someone upends a stereotype by saying or doing something unexpected.

Fair or not, certain parts of the U.S. are associated with certain cultural assumptions, perhaps none more pinholed than the rural south. When we hear Appalachia, a certain stereotype probably pops up in our minds—probably white, probably not well educated, probably racist. Even if there is some basis to a stereotype, we must always remember that human beings can never be painted with such broad strokes.

Enter Tyler Childers, a rising country music star whose old-school country fiddling has endeared him to a broad audience, but his new album may have a different kind of reach. "Long Violent History" was released Friday, along with a video message to his white rural fans explaining the culminating track by the same name. Watch it here:

Keep Reading Show less