A plastic bottle finds its way home, but its original owner is not so happy to see it.

This just may make you think differently about plastic — and might scare the sushi out of you too.


Could tossing a plastic bottle away possibly end up with you eating it in a fish? Here's what that journey might look like (and it's weirder than you might think).

1. Plastic never really goes away; it just breaks down into smaller and smaller pieces. So the more plastic we make, the more we live with. Want to take a guess at how much plastic the world dumps in the ocean every year? Click here to find out. No wonder the latest National Geographic maps include the Great Pacific Garbage Patch and there's such thing as an expert in the plastisphere, studying a whole new dimension in marine life.

But there's more, and it's kind of like Frankenstein.

2. Tiny bits of marine plastic appear to bond with toxins in the sea. Those plastic bits may get tiny, even too small for us to see, but they are acting like little toxin magnets, taking up a scary collection of chemicals and metals from the water.

3. Fish like to eat tiny bits of plastic. Who knows why, but they do. And fish that eat the plastic-toxin bits end up with the toxin in their tissues and organs and get sick.

4. There is some evidence that the plastic-toxins might accumulate in our bodies too. The world is a crazy connected place. But the answer isn't to avoid eating fish, which is darn good for you. We just need to realize we can't ever really throw plastic away.

Here are three easy ways to do something about plastic in the ocean and in your fish:

  • Check out this scorecard of plastic performance, and don't buy from companies that aren't working to reduce packaging and to recycle.
  • Dude. Carry your own water bottle.
  • Take your own bags shopping.
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$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


via schmoyoho / YouTube

If there's anything Americans need right now, it's a good laugh. In these divided times, if there is anyone who can provide one, it's "Weird Al" Yankovic.

The good news is he's back with a video that's a rare foray into American politics. Yankovic has avoided the topic throughout his career, although he did some non-partisan lampooning of the 2016 presidential debates with "Bad Hombres, Nasty Women."

In 2015, he told the Washington Times that he stays away from "sensitive" issues like "political topics. "And I don't want to divide my fan base if I can help it," he said.

"The other reason I don't do a lot of political humor is it dates pretty poorly," Yankovic said. "Things that are topical in the political arena this week would be old news a month from now, so that's probably not the kind of thing I want to have as part of my catalog."

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$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


The recent passing of Ruth Bader Ginsburg not only marked the end of an illustrious life of service to law and country, but the beginning of an unprecedented judicial nomination process. While Ginsburg's spot on the Supreme Court sits open, politicians and regular Americans alike argue over whether or not it should be filled immediately, basing their arguments on past practices and partisan points.

When a Supreme Court vacancy came up in February of 2016, nine months before the election, Senate Republicans led by Mitch McConnell refused to even take up a hearing to consider President Obama's pick for the seat, arguing that it was an election year and the people should have a say in who that seat goes to.

Four years later, a mere six weeks before the election, that reasoning has gone out the window as Senate Republicans race to get a nominee pushed through the approval process prior to election day. Now, they claim, because the Senate majority and President are of the same party, it makes sense to proceed with the nomination.

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via Katie Porter

Americans spend about $1,2000 a year on average for prescription drugs. That's more than anywhere else in the world. Private insurers and government programs pick up the bulk of the costs which we then pay through higher taxes and insurance premiums.

A major reason why Americans pay so much more than other countries is that the U.S government isn't allowed to negotiate drug prices with pharmaceutical companies.

To better understand the underlying reasons for these astronomical prices, the U.S. House of Representatives Oversight and Reform Committee held hearings on Wednesday with current and former executives of three major drug companies.

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