A giant corporation lied about science and got caught. By their own employees. Burn.
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League of Conservation Voters

An amazing new trove of fossil fuel industry documents was released in summer 2015.

Check out this Russia Today segment, featuring Aaron Huertas from the Union of Concerned Scientists. It's surprisingly zinger-filled for a discussion of corporate memos.

Pro tip: Listen for this phrase “cannot be denied." The part about employees leaking some of these documents starts at 1:48.


Fun fact: Did you know Lyndon Johnson was the first president to reference climate change? Wow!

The fossil fuel industry, the one that has funded climate change deniers, knew the science about climate change existed. And they knew it a long time ago.

The documents in The Climate Deception Dossiers mentioned in the segment point to two key documents in support:

  • In 1981, Exxon Mobile was having internal discussions about climate related to the Natuna gas field off Indonesia, according to an email published online in 2014.
  • In 1995, a 17-page, internal primer prepping for the 1995 Global Climate Coalition, written by the companies' own scientists.




Source for both GIFs: The Climate Deception Dossiers

That's right. In 1981, they were discussing the climate impact of a particularly large extraction project.

As referenced in the video above, that's seven years before NASA scientist James Hansen's iconic congressional testimony on global warming, widely regarded as the moment that raised broad awareness of climate change.

It was also about year after Kim Kardashian was born. Puts it in perspective, right?

In the segment, Thom Hartman says something slight that pinpoints what needs to change for us to move forward.

“The [fossil fuel] industry knew that their actions were driving the planet to a crisis, and they did nothing to avoid it. When scientists and the public cried out, they spent money to spread lies to cover their guilt."

After Exxon's climate change discovery in 1981, they continued to fund climate deniers for 27 more years. Is Thom's observation talking about the industry spending money shamelessly to cover up guilt or spreading lies to cover up embarrassment? Either way, we all need help sometimes to keep our guilty interests in check.

Could you imagine what we could have done if, instead of covering things up, the fossil fuel industry had decided to take action against climate change?

Exxon knew that fossil fuels would make climate change worse, but instead invested in major climate science denial groups to save their profits. Sign our petition and demand that the Department of Justice investigates Exxon.

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$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


via Lorie Shaull / Flickr

The epidemic of violence against Indigenous women in America is one of the country's most disturbing trends. A major reason it persists is because it's rarely discussed outside of the native community.

According to the Centers for Disease Control, murder is the third-leading cause of death among American Indian and Alaska Native women under age 19.

Women who live on some reservations face rates of violence that are as much as ten times higher than the national average.

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$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


The legality of abortion is one of the most polarized debates in America—but it doesn’t have to be.

People have big feelings about abortion, which is understandable. On one hand, you have people who feel that abortion is a fundamental women’s rights issue, that our bodily autonomy is not something you can legislate, and that those who oppose abortion rights are trying to control women through oppressive legislation. On the other, you have folks who believe that a fetus is a human individual first and foremost, that no one has the right to terminate a human life, and that those who support abortion rights are heartless murderers.

Then there are those of us in the messy middle. Those who believe that life begins at conception, that abortion isn’t something we’d choose—and we’d hope others wouldn’t choose—under most circumstances, yet who choose to vote to keep abortion legal.

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Every day, I wake up feeling like Peeta at the end of "The Hunger Games" series asking Katniss what's real and what's not real.

The first thing I do is run through a series of thoughts to orient myself to this bizarre reality we're currently in: "What day is it today? Umm...Tuesday, I think. Who is president of the United States? Donald Trump. Wait, is that right? That can't be right....No, yes, that's right. Wow. Are we still in the middle of a global pandemic that has killed 200,000+ Americans in six months? Yes. Are people still acting like it's a hoax? Apparently so. Is there still a ridiculous number of people who believe that an elite cabal of Satan-worshipping pedophiles is secretly running the world and trafficking children to harvest fear hormones from their blood, and that Donald Trump is going to save us all from it? Yup."

Then I lie there in dumbfounded disbelief before semi-rallying: "Okay, here we go."

It's not really okay, though. How any of us are expected to be able to function in this reality is beyond me. When we've gone beyond merely having different perspectives on issues and instead are living in completely different versions of reality, I can't figure out how to feel okay. Or, to be more accurate, when some of us are living in objective reality and a not-insignificant-enough number of us are living in a completely made-up land of alternative facts and perpetual gaslighting, it's hard not to feel like I'm the one losing my grip.

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