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The CW

It's common to do certain things in the dark: get your snooze on, watch a movie, maybe even deliver a baby.

Deliver a ... baby? In the dark? It happens.

It's a scenario that's almost hard to fathom, considering many of us can barely find a light switch in the dark without stubbing a toe on every piece of furniture. But as U.S.-based OB/GYN Dr. Laura Stachel discovered on a research trip in 2008, babies around the world too often are being delivered in near darkness — until she found a unique way to fix it.


Check out her story in this video and then scroll down to read the whole story!

In many countries, delivering a baby in darkness isn't what the doctor ordered — but it's what the doctor got.

Take rural Nigeria, for example, where the electricity can be extremely unreliable.

When Laura went there on her research trip, she was shocked at what she saw: nurses delivering babies at night, using lanterns and flashlights to see. Surgeons working in near darkness, and patients needing life-saving procedures but getting turned away because of the dark conditions.

As you can imagine, the results were often tragic.

A midwife in Tanzania holds a cellphone in her mouth to enable her to see and care for a woman. All photos from We Care Solar/Facebook, used with permission.

On a list of reasons why maternal mortality is still so high in 2016, "light" isn't usually one that would come to mind. But 300,000 women are dying during or right after pregnancy or childbirth every year, and access to light is a contributing factor.

Because as you know, babies don't wait until conditions are ideal to make their world appearances. Countries with unreliable electricity can only adapt as best as they can.

When Laura realized that access to light was such an issue, it gave her an idea that's paying off for a whole generation.

She and her husband, Hal Aronson, a solar energy educator in Berkley, California, developed an off-grid solar electric system and gave it to the Nigerian hospital. It provided reliable lighting, easier communication, and allowed for a blood bank refrigerator through its power source.

And guess what? Maternal mortality there decreased significantly. That's not a coincidence.

Back then, Hal Aronson and Laura Stachel were just getting started.

Knowing that portability and ease of use was going to be key for their success, they created a compact version of their solar electric system and dubbed it the "solar suitcase."

It's a suitcase, people! That provides light. And a power source. And saves the lives of moms and babies.

Solar suitcases in Tanzania are now replacing candlelight and oil wick lanterns.

What more could you want? Besides more of them ... everywhere. (Don't worry, they're working on that!)

More than 1,500 solar suitcases have served moms, babies, and health care workers in more than 27 countries since 2009. In the next five years, they hope to light up 20,000 health clinics.

What a difference some light makes. Photo taken after the Nepal earthquake, using a solar suitcase.

It's a seemingly simple solution with a huge impact. The suitcases currently cost around $1,645 each and have been funded by individuals, UN agencies, and foundations; although donations are obviously welcomed. The suitcases are provided at no cost to the clinics in need.

Some of our world's biggest problems can feel too complex and difficult to fix. Laura and the We Care Solar team are showing why that's not always the case.

Her simple fix is impacting maternal mortality rates around the world in the best way possible, and there is much more good to come.

She's a hero, shining bright.

Joy

Man uses TikTok to offer 'dinner with dad' to any kid that needs one, even adult ones

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud.

Come for the food, stay for the wholesomeness.

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud. His TikTok channel is dedicated to giving people intimate conversations they might long to have with their own father, but can’t. The most popular is his “Dinner With Dad” segment.

The concept is simple: Clayton, aka Dad, always sets down two plates of food. He always tells you what’s for dinner. He always blesses the food. He always checks in with how you’re doing.

I stress the stability here, because as someone who grew up with a less-than-stable relationship with their parents, it stood out immediately. I found myself breathing a sigh of relief at Clayton’s consistency. I also noticed the immediate emotional connection created just by being asked, “How was your day?” According to relationship coach and couples counselor Don Olund, these two elements—stability and connection—are fundamental cravings that children have of their parents. Perhaps we never really stop needing it from them.


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Joy

Meet Eva, the hero dog who risked her life saving her owner from a mountain lion

Wilson had been walking down a path with Eva when a mountain lion suddenly appeared.

Photo by Didssph on Unsplash

A sweet face and fierce loyalty: Belgian Malinois defends owner.

The Belgian Malinois is a special breed of dog. It's highly intelligent, extremely athletic and needs a ton of interaction. While these attributes make the Belgian Malinois the perfect dog for police and military work, they can be a bit of a handful as a typical pet.

As Belgian Malinois owner Erin Wilson jokingly told NPR, they’re basically "a German shepherd on steroids or crack or cocaine.”

It was her Malinois Eva’s natural drive, however, that ended up saving Wilson’s life.

According to a news release from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wilson had been walking down a path with Eva slightly ahead of her when a mountain lion suddenly appeared and swiped Wilson across the left shoulder. She quickly yelled Eva’s name and the dog’s instincts kicked in immediately. Eva rushed in to defend her owner.

It wasn’t long, though, before the mountain lion won the upper hand, much to Wilson’s horror.

She told TODAY, “They fought for a couple seconds, and then I heard her start crying. That’s when the cat latched on to her skull.”

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TikTok about '80s childhood is a total Gen X flashback.

As a Gen X parent, it's weird to try to describe my childhood to my kids. We're the generation that didn't grow up with the internet or cell phones, yet are raising kids who have never known a world without them. That difference alone is enough to make our 1980s childhoods feel like a completely different planet, but there are other differences too that often get overlooked.

How do you explain the transition from the brown and orange aesthetic of the '70s to the dusty rose and forest green carpeting of the '80s if you didn't experience it? When I tell my kids there were smoking sections in restaurants and airplanes and ashtrays everywhere, they look horrified (and rightfully so—what were we thinking?!). The fact that we went places with our friends with no quick way to get ahold of our parents? Unbelievable.

One day I described the process of listening to the radio, waiting for my favorite song to come on so I could record it on my tape recorder, and how mad I would get when the deejay talked through the intro of the song until the lyrics started. My Spotify-spoiled kids didn't even understand half of the words I said.

And '80s hair? With the feathered bangs and the terrible perms and the crunchy hair spray? What, why and how?

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