Heroes

Who'd Have Thought A Man Talking About His Arm Would Be So Interesting?

Is the whole of science, culture, and law compressed into a tiny mole on his forearm?

Who'd Have Thought A Man Talking About His Arm Would Be So Interesting?

In case you missed any of that, here are the lyrics according to the artist:

I want you to imagine my arm is a timeline
And here is the start of defined time
in the middle is all of civilized life
when sentience entered into the pipeline
about 50,000 years of cities, towns and theories
up until we're the ones in the limelight
that's fine, right?
ok
so then after this hindsight we have the millions and millions of years of future
where billions of civilians will be soon, yeah? now given this opinion and since computers are getting better and better

according to moore's law they'll exponentially develop eventually exceeding the power of a human brain
around eleven more years at the concluded rate, but anyway
if you could wait a little longer, it'd be true to say that computers gain the cumulative brain power of the human race - so soon you could make a simulation of nature; a virtual universe that for all intents and purposes is basically a version of the world, like the matrix.

So just to clarify, past, there's centuries of present here, then potentially there's several million years of future where you can emulate a world within your brain.

ok
Now with that said.
Is it more likely to hear that
you were born within this relatively tiny time period,
or that you're currently in these millions of years here
trying to find an interesting experience

is it more probable
that you are one of just 7 billion people living in this follicle
or that you're a part of the phenomenal volume of humans in this anthropological future
The logical conclusion seems obvious.

'cause you know
when you finally come to the thought that
the whole of science, culture and law are
compressed into a tiny mole on my forearm
compared to the aeons ahead of us,
it seems like some serious evidence.

Well, if we assume that between here and my wrist
that humans don't go nearly extinct
through nuclear war
or there are more
new brutal transgenic diseases we're not
immune to that cause a pandemic to cease us,

and that it would be just too much to suggest that
around about here on this appendage
that anarchy proceeds an unprecedented
level of mass unemployment and overpopulation,
or that pollution makes the ozone stop negating
UV radiation...

and we rule out a new ice age and any orbital invasions from horrible aliens
then our next probable destination as a species is technological innovation to the degrees I described.
If anything, it seems more contrived to imply that our lives started right at the time in which science made strides and it finally guided society to new heights.

Now you might just be finding this mighty exciting... or denying it's likely and try criticising... but I will remind you that I'm just describing an idea I think is quite an inspiring one.
And the icing on the cake is the enticing implications
But analysing them can wait for another time on another day

Yes, moore's law was just a prediction so
all this thought is potentially fictional
and even if we did invent this pivotal
instrument capable of inflicting our
cranium with pictures of places,
which sounds ace,
it only takes us up until the sun swells and makes this planet bake and frazzle
unless we seriously work on our space travel

But hey, have a think about it; I just think it's an interesting concept I thought up that I wanted to share. Oh I forgot to say; hi! I'm Dave - and now I'll wave you goodbye with these aeons of time.

Have a nice day.
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