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Three women defied sexist expectations to become some of the most important allies in WWII.

With the season finale of Marvel's spy show "Agent Carter" airing tonight (Feb. 24, 2015), take a look at some real badass spy women.

In "Agent Carter," Peggy Carter does a million awesome things, from using spy gadgets to fighting sleeper agents. Here are some of the real women she could have been based on.


1. Andreé Borrel

Like Peggy, Andreé knew her way around a parachute.

After a successful career of leading Allied troops out of occupied France via an underground railway to Spain, Burrell was one of the first women to parachute into France in September 1942 after joining the Special Operations Executive (SOE), a covert British organization. By March 1943, she had become second in command of the local network. That's badass.

2. Nancy Wake

Carter knows how to use lethal force when necessary. And so did Nancy Wake. Another member of the SOE, Nancy Wake led a spectacular life: By the time she was 30, she had run away from her home in New Zealand, lived in London and New York, had become a nurse, and finally had become a journalist. She was in Europe when the Nazis rose, witnessing and reporting on terrible things in the process.


In the war, before becoming a member of the SOE, among other things, she was a courier in the French Resistance, was the Gestapo's most wanted person for her part of the escape network, and earned the nickname "The White Mouse" for her ability to never be captured. Oh, and with her fellow resistance members, she killed 1,400 SS soldiers, NBD.

3. Virginia Hall

Could you imagine having six different identities to keep track of? Or driving a manual transmission ambulance through a war zone? Or having to take over your superior's courier duties because they were captured and the very same thing might happen to you? Could you imagine having to do that with one foot?


Virginia Hall did. After being put on the German's most wanted list, she, like Carter, went undercover. Unlike Carter, though, her undercover assignment was a lot less glamorous. She disguised herself, doing farm work in France while training resistance groups.

Badass.

via Lady A / Twitter and Whittlz / Flickr

In one of the most glaringly hypocritical moves in recent history, the band formerly known as Lady Antebellum is suing black blues singer Anita "Lady A" White, to use her stage name she's performed under for over three decades.

Lady Antebellum announced it had changed its name to Lady A on June 11 as part of its commitment to "examining our individual and collective impact and marking the necessary changes to practice antiracism."

Antebellum refers to an era in the American south before the civil war when black people were held as slaves.

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