More

This memo Joe Biden sent his staffers on work-life balance is a must-read.

'I would like to take a moment and make something clear to everyone.'

Back in November 2014, Vice President Joe Biden sent a seemingly everyday memo to his staffers.

But on Aug. 6, 2016, it resurfaced online after Gavin Newsom, the lieutenant governor of California, posted a photo of the memo to his Facebook wall.

And it started to get the internet's attention.


Wow. What an excellent example. From this month's Esquire.

Posted by Gavin Newsom on Saturday, August 6, 2016

The photo of the memo, which was published in a recent issue of Esquire, spells out how Biden really feels about work-life balance.

Here's how the memo goes (emphasis added is mine):

To My Wonderful Staff,
I would like to take a moment and make something clear to everyone. I do not expect, nor do I want, any of you to miss or sacrifice important family obligations for work. Family obligations include, but are not limited to, family birthdays, anniversaries, weddings, any religious ceremonies, such as first communions and bar mitzvahs, graduations, and times of need, such as an illness or a loss in the family. This is very important to me. In fact, I will go so far as to say that if I find out that you are working with me while missing important family responsibilities, it will disappoint me greatly. This has been an unwritten rule since my days in the Senate.
Thank you all for the hard work.
Sincerely, Joe


Biden's memo echoes what the facts have said for quite some time now: Americans should make work-life balance a priority.

We work long hours. We're definitely more stressed out than we should be. And far too many of us get way less sleep than needed.

Making sure we're spending time unplugged from work — hanging out with loved ones, getting some fresh air, even just watching a favorite sitcom to take a break from the daily grind — does the body (and mind) good.

Photo by Andreas Rentz/Getty Images.

Research suggests that when we prioritize work-life balance, we're actually more productive, less likely to quit our jobs, and just generally healthier.

Work-life balance is better for you and your employer.

Unfortunately, not everyone in the U.S. has the luxury to take advantage of these work-life balance benefits — mostly those in low-income or blue collar roles, who have less say in their work schedules and need to be on the clock as much as possible to make ends meet.

That's probably why Biden has been a fighter for policies like paid sick leave and guaranteed time off for new moms — legislation that would especially help these folks.

Judging from the comments on Newsom's post, Biden's memo is definitely resonating with lots of people.

The vice president doesn't get everything right all the time. But on this issue — and one or two others — he really does get it.

Thanks for looking out, Joe.

Photo by Tracey Nearmy/Pool/Getty Images.

Joy

Man uses TikTok to offer 'dinner with dad' to any kid that needs one, even adult ones

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud.

Come for the food, stay for the wholesomeness.

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud. His TikTok channel is dedicated to giving people intimate conversations they might long to have with their own father, but can’t. The most popular is his “Dinner With Dad” segment.

The concept is simple: Clayton, aka Dad, always sets down two plates of food. He always tells you what’s for dinner. He always blesses the food. He always checks in with how you’re doing.

I stress the stability here, because as someone who grew up with a less-than-stable relationship with their parents, it stood out immediately. I found myself breathing a sigh of relief at Clayton’s consistency. I also noticed the immediate emotional connection created just by being asked, “How was your day?” According to relationship coach and couples counselor Don Olund, these two elements—stability and connection—are fundamental cravings that children have of their parents. Perhaps we never really stop needing it from them.


Keep Reading Show less

Alberto Cartuccia Cingolani wows audiences with his amazing musical talents.

Mozart was known for his musical talent at a young age, playing the harpsichord at age 4 and writing original compositions at age 5. So perhaps it's fitting that a video of 5-year-old piano prodigy Alberto Cartuccia Cingolani playing Mozart has gone viral as people marvel at his musical abilities.

Alberto's legs can't even reach the pedals, but that doesn't stop his little hands from flying expertly over the keys as incredible music pours out of the piano at the 10th International Musical Competition "Città di Penne" in Italy. Even if you've seen young musicians play impressively, it's hard not to have your jaw drop at this one. Sometimes a kid comes along who just clearly has a gift.

Of course, that gift has been helped along by two professional musician parents. But no amount of teaching can create an ability like this.

Keep Reading Show less

TikTok about '80s childhood is a total Gen X flashback.

As a Gen X parent, it's weird to try to describe my childhood to my kids. We're the generation that didn't grow up with the internet or cell phones, yet are raising kids who have never known a world without them. That difference alone is enough to make our 1980s childhoods feel like a completely different planet, but there are other differences too that often get overlooked.

How do you explain the transition from the brown and orange aesthetic of the '70s to the dusty rose and forest green carpeting of the '80s if you didn't experience it? When I tell my kids there were smoking sections in restaurants and airplanes and ashtrays everywhere, they look horrified (and rightfully so—what were we thinking?!). The fact that we went places with our friends with no quick way to get ahold of our parents? Unbelievable.

One day I described the process of listening to the radio, waiting for my favorite song to come on so I could record it on my tape recorder, and how mad I would get when the deejay talked through the intro of the song until the lyrics started. My Spotify-spoiled kids didn't even understand half of the words I said.

And '80s hair? With the feathered bangs and the terrible perms and the crunchy hair spray? What, why and how?

Keep Reading Show less