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This kid's reaction to finding out he's cancer-free is a tearjerker.

7-year-old boy beats cancer, freaks out adorably.

This kid's reaction to finding out he's cancer-free is a tearjerker.

In March 2013, Ben Morris had just turned 4 years old. That was when his parents, Casi and Mike Morris, learned he had cancer.

A few short weeks later, acute lymphoblastic leukemia had transformed Ben from his rowdy self into a frail, weak child near death in a hospital bed. “We almost lost him,” Casi says.

She describes the years to follow in this way: “Have you ever had a kid reach for the stove or step off a curb and a car is coming? That moment when your stomach clenches, adrenaline dumps, right before you throw yourself in front of the danger? That's what it is to have a kid with cancer, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. To say we were a mess is an understatement.“


All photos and video by Casi Morris, used with permission.

But when Ben’s big brother Ethan came to visit the little hospital room, he showed his parents how to make it through the difficult journey ahead.

Ethan wasn’t fazed by Ben’s frailty. He treated his little brother as he always had — he busted out the Legos, and they played together. In that moment, Casi and Mike knew they could follow Ethan’s lead in trying to provide as much normalcy as possible to their boys. That’s exactly what they did over the next 1,167 days of Ben’s chemotherapy treatments.


Ben and Ethan during Ben’s treatment.

First, they deemed his port an Iron Man arc reactor. The green chemo hanging from the IV pole was Ninja Turtle ooze. His hospital bed shape-shifted from a pirate ship to the Mystery Machine to a deserted island. For over three years, the Morris family held onto hope that good news would come ... and then it did.

In June 2016, Casi was able to tell her boys that Ben’s lab results came back clear of cancer.

Ben won the battle. And the boys could barely contain themselves when they heard the chemo was coming to an end.

Lucky for us, Casi recorded their reaction. Since she posted it on June 1, 2016, it’s been viewed over 400,000 times — because it’s just about the sweetest thing ever:

“We did it,” Casi says. “There were so many times I didn’t think we could.”

Congrats to you and your whole family, Ben!

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This year more than ever, many families are anticipating an empty dinner table. Shawn Kaplan lived this experience when his father passed away, leaving his mother who struggled to provide food for her two children. Shawn is now a dedicated volunteer and donor with Second Harvest Food Bank in Middle Tennessee and encourages everyone to give back this holiday season with Amazon.

Watch the full story:

Over one million people in Tennessee are at risk of hunger every day. And since the outbreak of COVID-19, Second Harvest has seen a 50% increase in need for their services. That's why Amazon is Delivering Smiles and giving back this holiday season by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Second Harvest to feed those hit the hardest this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local food bank or charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your selected charity.

Sometimes it seems like social media is too full of trolls and misinformation to justify its continued existence, but then something comes along that makes it all worth it.

Apparently, a song many of us have never heard of shot to the top of the charts in Italy in 1972 for the most intriguing reason. The song, written and performed by Adriano Celentano and is called "Prisencolinensinainciusol" which means...well, nothing. It's gibberish. In fact, the entire song is nonsense lyrics made to sound like English, and oddly, it does.

Occasionally, you can hear what sounds like a real word or phrase here and there—"eyes" and "color balls died" and "alright" a few times, for example—but it mostly just sounds like English without actually being English. It's like an auditory illusion and it does some super trippy things to your brain to listen to it.

Plus the video someone shared to go with it is fantastic. It's gone crazy viral because how could it not.

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A lot of people here are like family to me," Michelle says about Bread for the City — a community nonprofit located in Washington DC that provides local residents with food, clothing, health care, social advocacy, and legal services. And since the pandemic began, the need to support organizations like Bread for the City is greater than ever, which is why Amazon is Delivering Smiles to local charities across the country this holiday season.

Watch the full story:

Amazon is giving back by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, and donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Bread for the City provide to those disproportionately impacted this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your charity of choice.
via Twins Trust / Twitter

Twins born with separate fathers are rare in the human population. Although there isn't much known about heteropaternal superfecundation — as it's known in the scientific community — a study published in The Guardian, says about one in every 400 sets of fraternal twins has different fathers.

Simon and Graeme Berney-Edwards, a gay married couple, from London, England both wanted to be the biological father of their first child.

"We couldn't decide on who would be the biological father," Simon told The Daily Mail. "Graeme said it should be me, but I said that he had just as much right as I did."

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via Nick Hodge / Twitter and Jlhervas / Flickr

President-elect Joe Biden has sweeping plans for expanding LGBTQ rights when he takes office in January 2021. Among them, a plan to reverse Donald Trump's near ban on allowing transgender people to serve in the military.

In 2016, President Obama allowed transgender individuals to serve openly in the U.S. military and have access to gender-affirming psychological and medical care.

However, the Trump administration reversed course in 2017, when Trump dropped a surprise tweet saying the military "cannot be burdened with the tremendous medical costs and disruption that transgender in the military would entail."

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