This dad perfectly nails fatherhood with his hilarious comics.

Jonathan Jui has hopped around a lot in his life.

He was born in London, raised in Cincinnati, schooled in New England, and employed in Asia, all before moving back to London again to settle down with a woman he calls "my middle-school sweetheart."

The couple gave birth to their son, Milo, last year. He's 18 months old now. Cue the all-too-familiar journey: Diapers. Vomit. Sleep deprivation. Laughter. Joy. Poop. Repeat.


Jui doesn't have much of an artistic background outside of a little drawing in elementary school, but he wanted to find a way to hold on to the hilarious, painful, and even mundane moments that began to fill his days.

So he started drawing.

Jui creates cartoons to "capture those inopportune moments you don't want to forget."

When it's not a good time to stop and take a picture, or writing about the moment later feels forced, Jui draws it.

All images by Jonathan Jui, used with permission.

He began sharing the drawings on Instagram, not really expecting anyone to take notice.

But over the months, his following ballooned by thousands and thousands.

He says he tries to find humor in every situation and express that in his art.

"I want to feel like I'm part of a broader group of people who are suffering to some degree under the weight of parenthood," he says. "It's just trying to find the silver linings."

He tackles the obvious: Potty-training gone wrong. The mind-numbing routine. And the sweet little moments that make it all worth it.

In one post, he laments the size and smell of his young son's bowel movements. In another, Jui pokes fun at his own inability to cook the most basic dishes.

It's raw and hilarious honesty. No wonder people have responded so strongly.

"I like the fact that it will usually make another person smile or have a nice chuckle," Jui says of his work. "It makes you feel like you're not alone."

He also says it's a subtle taste of what's to come for all his friends — and others — who don't have kids yet.

"I really enjoy when people say, 'This is me right now.'"

"That's exactly what I'm trying to go for," he says.

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Davina Agudelo was born in Miami, Florida, but she grew up in Medellín, Colombia.

"I am so grateful for my upbringing in Colombia, surrounded by mountains and mango trees, and for my Colombian family," Agudelo says. "Colombia is the place where I learned what's truly essential in life." It's also where she found her passion for the arts.

While she was growing up, Colombia was going through a violent drug war, and Agudelo turned to literature, theater, singing, and creative writing as a refuge. "Journaling became a sacred practice, where I could leave on the page my dreams & longings as well as my joy and sadness," she says. "During those years, poetry came to me naturally. My grandfather was a poet and though I never met him, maybe there is a little bit of his love for poetry within me."

In 1998, when she left her home and everyone she loved and moved to California, the arts continued to be her solace and comfort. She got her bachelor's degree in theater arts before getting certified in journalism at UCLA. It was there she realized the need to create a media platform that highlighted the positive contributions of LatinX in the US.

"I know the power that storytelling and writing our own stories have and how creative writing can aid us in our own transformation."

In 2012, she started Alegría Magazine and it was a great success. Later, she refurbished a van into a mobile bookstore to celebrate Latin American and LatinX indie authors and poets, while also encouraging children's reading and writing in low-income communities across Southern California.

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via Number 10 / Flickr

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) approved a measure last month that could pave the way for the Catholic Church to deny President Joe Biden communion. The conservative bishops hope to prevent Biden from participating in the sacred ritual because of his support for abortion rights.

Biden is a devout Catholic who considered becoming a priest in his youth. He rarely misses mass, holds a rosary while making critical decisions, and often quotes scriptures. When asked about the bishops' decision Biden said it is "a private matter and I don't think that's going to happen."

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