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They May Just Look Like Swirling Clouds, But What They Actually Are Is SO Much More Sinister

NASA produced this amazing video to show what happens to carbon dioxide and monoxide in our atmosphere over the course of a year. It’s hypnotic, like looking danger in the eye.

We've been hearing for a long time about the dangerous game we're playing with too much carbon dioxide, aka CO2, in the atmosphere. Dunno about you, but for me, it's been a little abstract. I just kind picture the stuff as a constant haze over the earth.

It's not true.


CO2 has its own weird seasons.

It all has to do with how much of it our plant life is absorbing at any given time. Thank you, plants.

My CO2 is your CO2.

Carbon dioxide doesn't stay put. It's popping up in one place and drifting everywhere else. Watching this makes it obvious what a global problem too much CO2 anywhere is.

2006: 12 Months of Yipes

NASA's taken CO2 data for a year and generated a stunning computer model of where it was, how much, and when during 2006.

It looks like fire burning up our skies.

Which it kind of is. And with 2006 so many years ago, I shudder to imagine what it looks like now, right?

It's pretty simple to understand. If you're seeing colors, you're seeing CO2:

The black and white clouds are carbon monoxide.

Y'know, the stuff that'll kill you in an enclosed space.

Here's what went down in 2006.

NASA's Bill Putman talks you through what you're seeing:

via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.


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This article originally appeared on 09.08.16


92-year-old Norma had a strange and heartbreaking routine.

Every night around 5:30 p.m., she stood up and told the staff at her Ohio nursing home that she needed to leave. When they asked why, she said she needed to go home to take care of her mother. Her mom, of course, had long since passed away.

Behavior like Norma's is quite common for older folks suffering from Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia. Walter, another man in the same assisted living facility, demanded breakfast from the staff every night around 7:30.

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