Atlanta-based CreativeSoul Photography brought an inspiring artistic vision to life that highlights the beauty of black girls and their natural hair.

Regis and Kahran are the husband-and-wife duo behind the photography studio, and their series "Afro Art" represents their expertise in capturing portraits as well as visual storytelling. The striking images feature young girls in elaborate costuming and hairstyles, from a Baroque-era aesthetic to steampunk clothing to fierce high-fashion ensembles.

The girls featured in "Afro Art" are stylish and carry themselves with confidence and grace. The feelings evoked from the series speak to the larger idea surrounding it. “We feel that it is so important for kids of color to be able to see positive images that look like them in the media,” Kahran told My Modern Met in an email. “Unfortunately the lack of diversity often plays into the stereotypes that they are not ‘good enough’ and often forces kids to have low self-esteem.”


All photos by CreativeSoul Photo, used with permission.

To help combat these negative feelings, the couple showcases kids who love how they look.

“We hope that viewers will see the beauty and versatility of afro hair,” Kahran explains, “and we hope that girls around the world will be inspired to love their unique differences and beauty within.”

"Afro Art" came together from CreativeSoul’s travels:

“We worked on these series in various states in the US (New York, California, Texas, Georgia). In each state, we created a different theme and came up with clothing pieces and accessories that went with that theme.”

Although meticulous in preparation, the duo still left some room for spontaneity. “On set, we just styled everything on the fly and worked with our hairstylist to create unique looks for each model.”

See how the different themes come together to make one gorgeously shot and styled series.

In their series "Afro Art," CreativeSoul Photography captures striking portraits of girls who are rocking their natural hair.

They feature black girls who wear elaborate Baroque-esque ensembles …

... as well as steampunk-inspired outfits …

… and many other styles.

The overall goal of "Afro Art" is to show kids of color more people that look like them in the media.

“We hope that girls around the world will be inspired to love their unique differences and beauty within,” Kahran explains.

This piece originally appeared at My Modern Met and is reprinted here with permission.

Photo by CDC on Unsplash

When schools closed early in the spring, the entire country was thrown for a loop. Parents had to figure out what to do with their kids. Teachers had to figure out how to teach students at home. Kids had to figure out how to navigate a totally new routine that was being created and altered in real time.

For many families, it was a big honking mess—one that many really don't want to repeat in the fall.

But at the same time, the U.S. hasn't gotten a handle on the coronavirus pandemic. As states have begun reopening—several of them too early, according to public health officials—COVID-19 cases have risen to the point where we now have more cases per day than we did during the height of the outbreak in the spring. And yet President Trump is making a huge push to get schools to reopen fully in the fall, even threatening to possibly remove funding if they don't.

It's worth pointing out that Denmark and Norway had 10 and 11 new cases yesterday. Sweden and Germany had around 300 each. The U.S. had 55,000. (And no, that's not because we're testing thousands of times more people than those countries are.)

The president of the country's largest teacher's union had something to say about Trump's push to reopen schools. Lily Eskelsen Garcia says that schools do need to reopen, but they need to be able to reopen safely—with measures that will help keep both students and teachers from spreading the virus and making the pandemic worse. (Trump has also criticized the CDCs "very tough & expensive guidelines" for reopening schools.)

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