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America's first LGBTQ Pride marchers stormed the streets of New York City in 1970, demanding to be seen as human.

These marches didn't appear out of thin air, of course. Queer New Yorkers had had it by then.

Photo by Diana Davies/The New York Public Library.


The previous summer, anger and pain had boiled over in lower Manhattan.

In the early hours of June 28, 1969, police violently raided a queer bar, The Stonewall Inn, for no other reason than the patrons were LGBTQ.

For years, queer New Yorkers had endured harassment at the hands of cops; the June 28 raid wasn't an isolated incident.

So they rioted. They threw bricks. They refused to leave in peace. They made front page headlines too, birthing the modern LGBTQ rights movement. And those first Stonewall rioters — led largely by transgender and non-binary people of color — sparked a revolution.

Exactly one year after the Stonewall riots, on June 28, 1970, America's very first Pride march took place in New York City. At the time, it was celebrated as Gay Liberation Day.  

Photo by Diana Davies/The New York Public Library.

The following year, a second consecutive march ensued. A movement was gaining steam.

These people really were badass rebels.

They saw their own humanity — and fought for it fiercely — while the rest of the world refused to acknowledge it.

Photo by Diana Davies/The New York Public Library.

Through these first Pride marches, homosexuality was still considered a mental disorder by the American Psychiatric Association. There were no openly LGBTQ politicians at any level of government across the country, nor were there any federal policies protecting gay rights (let alone trans rights) in any form. Anti-sodomy laws were still in place in every state except Illinois.  

To boldly take to the streets under those circumstances — when your very existence was scoffed at by large majorities of Americans — takes a ridiculous amount of bravery.

Photo by Diana Davies/The New York Public Library.

Those who were marching in the first years were rebel badasses, motivated to their core to stand up for what they believed in.

The world can be a dark place. Some days, it feels like we're going backward, away from progress. And maybe some days we are.

But in those moments, it's worth remembering the people in these photos. People like Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera, who launched Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (STAR) to group, protect, and house homeless transgender people in New York City. All the rioters at Stonewall they stood beside. The very first LGBTQ Pride marchers filling the streets — angry but hopeful, demanding the world change.

They didn't buckle to hateful forces then. And neither should we.

Marsha P. Johnson. Photo by Diana Davies/The New York Public Library.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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People have clearly missed their free treats.

The COVID-19 pandemic had us waving a sad farewell to many of life’s modern conveniences. And where it certainly hasn’t been the worst loss, not having free samples at grocery stores has undoubtedly been a buzzkill. Sure, one can shop around without the enticing scent of hot, fresh artisan pizza cut into tiny slices or testing out the latest fancy ice cream … but is it as joyful? Not so much.

Trader Joe’s, famous for its prepandemic sampling stations, has recently brought the tradition back to life, and customers are practically dancing through the aisles.


On the big comeback weekend, people flocked to social media to share images and videos of their free treats, including festive Halloween cookies (because who doesn’t love TJ’s holiday themed items?) along with hopeful messages for the future.
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She's enjoying the big benefits of some simple life hacks.

James Clear’s landmark book “Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones” has sold more than 9 million copies worldwide. The book is incredibly popular because it has a simple message that can help everyone. We can develop habits that increase our productivity and success by making small changes to our daily routines.

"It is so easy to overestimate the importance of one defining moment and underestimate the value of making small improvements on a daily basis,” James Clear writes. “It is only when looking back 2 or 5 or 10 years later that the value of good habits and the cost of bad ones becomes strikingly apparent.”

His work proves that we don’t need to move mountains to improve ourselves, just get 1% better every day.

Most of us are reluctant to change because breaking old habits and starting new ones can be hard. However, there are a lot of incredibly easy habits we can develop that can add up to monumental changes.

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