These facts about sick days just might get your tummy turning.

Despite being the richest country on the planet, the United States can be pretty cheap when it comes to its workers.

The Economic Policy Institute writes:


"Currently, more than one-third of all workers — 39 percent — have no paid sick days. When these workers get sick, they are forced either to go to work, or to stay home without pay and risk losing their job."

The U.S. ranks lowest — yes, lowest among developed countries when it comes to providing workers with paid sick leave and vacation.

Paid time off is less available to people who need it most.

The highest paid 10% of workers are over four times more likely to have access to paid sick days than the lowest paid 10%.

Think about how that might affect not just low-wage workers, but the people around them — to have to work through illness or injury, prolonging their recovery and exposing others to health risks or even having to leave a loved one in a time of need.

And think of how lack of access to paid sick leave might affect already drastic inequality — with low-wage workers having to forgo pay and risk their jobs to attend to their health or a loved one's.

But here's the thing: It doesn't have to be this way.

The Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania thinks we need to push for a policy change:

"In the national struggle over economic inequality, Wharton management professor Peter Cappelli calls mandatory paid sick days for workers the lowest of the low-hanging fruit.
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It has long been the case in the U.S. that many workers are granted paid sick leave by virtue of an individual employer policy or collective bargaining agreement. ... But a national policy regarding paid sick leave has long been a missing link."

You can help to make it possible by pushing your lawmakers and showing love (online and offline) for workers all over the country who are fighting for fair pay and benefits and safer work conditions.

It's not just the economy that's at stake. It's our integrity as a nation.

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

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Vanna White appeared on "The Price Is Right" in 1980.

Vanna White has been a household name in the United States for decades, which is kind of hilarious when you consider how she gained her fame and fortune. Since 1982, the former model and actress has made millions walking back and forth turning letters (and later simply touching them—yay technology) on the game show "Wheel of Fortune."

That's it. Walking back and forth in a pretty evening gown, flipping letters and clapping for contestants. More on that job in a minute…

As a member of Gen X, television game shows like "Wheel of Fortune" and "The Price is Right" send me straight back to my childhood. Watching this clip from 1980 of Vanna White competing on "The Price is Right" two years before she started turning letters on "Wheel of Fortune" is like stepping into a time machine. Bob Barker's voice, the theme music, the sound effects—I swear I'm home from school sick, lying on the ugly flowered couch with my mom checking my forehead and bringing me Tang.

This video has it all: the early '80s hairstyles, a fresh-faced Vanna White and Bob Barker's casual sexism that would never in a million years fly today.

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