There are times when a pizza delivery makes your day. This delivery changed a 76-year-old's life.
True
Dignity Health old

Usually the best part about getting a pizza delivered is ... the pizza.

Is there anything more beautiful? Photo by Brendan C/Flickr.


For 76-year-old Lee Haase, the best part was who delivered his.

It was pizza delivery driver Angela Nguyen who showed up at his address in Ham Lake, Minnesota, with a pizza one day. I don't think she was expecting the interaction they were about to have.

Photo by Ivory Hecker/KARE 11.

"Lee has told me that he's pretty much given up on life," she told KARE 11.

His son had died in a tragic accident. His home had been destroyed in a storm and was now unlivable. He was alone on his property, in extreme poverty, in a 12-foot camper that had no heat, no running water, and no way to shower or relieve himself.

He was confused, and most troubling, he had no plan for the approaching chilly winter months.

Angela talked to him about his circumstances and left his property that day with an entirely different mission than when she arrived.

Photo by Ivory Hecker/KARE 11.

"Living in this trailer with no heat, no sanitation whatsoever — he has no toilet — no water, nothing, is not acceptable to me," she said.

When she got home, she decided to spread the word. She launched a GoFundMe page with hopes that maybe people in the area would like to know about their fellow community member and help out if possible.

She wrote on the page, "I don't know Lee too well personally, but what I do know is he's kind, likes bluegrass music and used to love to fish. If you can help thank you. If not can you please pray?"

They delivered.

A look at Angela's GoFundMe page. The whole story is there.

In just one month, members of the community not only answered her request, they went the extra mile. More than $30,000 was raised, and hopefully even more is to come.

They all care about fellow Minnesotan Lee Haase, regardless if they know him. That's evident immediately from the comments: Strangers keep popping up with mentions of extra storage units, space heaters, blankets, groceries, gift cards — you name it. They all want to help.

The response has been so overwhelming, the new goal is to build Lee an actual home.

"It's hard to explain [how I feel]," said Lee. "Just pretty awesome."

A home!

To think, the goal started with Lee trying to eat dinner and ended with an entire community rallying around him to help him live a more comfortable, humane life.

One of the comments on the fundraising page reads, "God bless you for starting this, Angela. We need more people like you in the world."

We do need more Angelas in the world, and I think we have them. When we take time to look up once in awhile and think outside of ourselves, anything can happen.

This story is beautiful proof. See more of it from KARE 11's segment.

Courtesy of The Commit Partnership
True

For Festus Oyinwola, a 19-year-old first-generation college student from Dallas, Texas, the financial burden of attending college made his higher education dreams feel like a faraway goal.

As his high school graduation neared, Oyinwola feared he would have to interrupt his educational pursuits for at least a year to save up to attend college.

That changed when Oyinwola learned of the Dallas County Promise, a new program launched by The Commit Partnership, a community navigator that works to ensure that all North Texas students receive an equitable education.

Photo by Element5 Digital on Unsplash

The Dallas County Promise covers any cost of tuition not included in financial aid grants. To date, nearly 60 high schools in Dallas County currently participate in this initiative.

It pairs students — including Oyinwola — with a success coach for the following three years of their education.

To ensure that students like Oyinwola have the opportunity to build a solid foundation, The Commit Partnership is supported by businesses like Capital One who are committed to driving meaningful change in Dallas County through improved access to education.

The bank's support comes as part of its initial $200 million, multi-year commitment to advance socioeconomic mobility through the Capital One Impact Initiative.

Keep Reading Show less

Just over a year into the coronavirus pandemic, we're finally seeing a light at the end of our socially distanced tunnel. We still have a ways to go, but with millions of vaccines being doled out daily, we're well on our way toward somewhat normal life again. Hallelujah.

As we head toward that light, it's natural to look back over our shoulders at the past year to see what we're leaving behind. There's the "good riddance" stuff of course—the mass deaths, the missing loved ones, the closed-up businesses, the economic, social and political strife—which no one is going to miss.

But there's personal stuff, too. As we reflect on how we coped, how we spent our time, what we did and didn't do this past year, we're thinking about what we'll be bringing out of the tunnel with us.

And some of us are finding that comes with a decent dose of regret. Maybe a little guilt. Some disappointment as we go down the coulda-woulda-shoulda road.

Keep Reading Show less
RODNAE Productions via Pexels
True

The past year has changed the way a lot of people see the world and brought the importance of global change to the forefront. However, even social impact entrepreneurs have had to adapt to the changing circumstances brought on by the Coronavirus pandemic.

"The first barrier is lack of funding. COVID-19 has deeply impacted many of our supporters, and we presume it will continue to do so. Current market volatility has caused many of our supporters to scale back or withdraw their support altogether," said Brisa de Angulo, co-founder of A Breeze of Hope Foundation, a non-profit that prevents childhood sexual violence in Bolivia and winner of the 2020 Elevate Prize.

To help social entrepreneurs scale their impact for the second year in a row, The Elevate Prize is awarding $5 million to 10 innovators, activists, and problem–solvers who are making a difference in their communities every day.

"We want to see extraordinary people leading high-impact projects that are elevating opportunities for all people, elevating issues and their solutions, or elevating understanding of and between people," The Elevate Prize website states.

Founded in 2019 by entrepreneur and philanthropist Joseph Deitch, The Elevate Prize is dedicated to giving unsung social entrepreneurs the necessary resources to scale their impact and to ultimately help inspire and awaken the hero in all of us.

"The Elevate Prize remains committed to finding a radically diverse group of innovative problem solvers and investing unconventional and personalized resources that bring greater visibility to them as leaders and the vital work they do. We make good famous," said Carolina García Jayaram, executive director, Elevate Prize Foundation.

The application process will take place in two phases. Applicants have till May 5 for Phase 1, which will include a short written application. A select number of those applicants will then be chosen for Phase 2, which includes a more robust set of questions later this summer. Ten winners will be announced in October 2021.

In addition to money, winners will also receive support from The Elevate Prize to help amplify their mission, achieve their goals, and receive mentorship and industry connections.

Last year, 1,297 candidates applied for the prize.

The 10 winners include Simprints, a UK-based nonprofit implementing biometric solutions to give people in the developing world hope and access to a better healthcare system; ReThink, a patented, innovative app that detects offensive messages and gives users a chance to reconsider posting them; and Guitars Over Guns, an organization bridging the opportunity gap for youth from vulnerable communities through transformational access to music, connectivity, and self-empowerment.

You can learn more about last year's winners, here.

If you know of someone or you yourself are ready to scale your impact, apply here today.