There are times when a pizza delivery makes your day. This delivery changed a 76-year-old's life.
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Dignity Health old

Usually the best part about getting a pizza delivered is ... the pizza.

Is there anything more beautiful? Photo by Brendan C/Flickr.


For 76-year-old Lee Haase, the best part was who delivered his.

It was pizza delivery driver Angela Nguyen who showed up at his address in Ham Lake, Minnesota, with a pizza one day. I don't think she was expecting the interaction they were about to have.

Photo by Ivory Hecker/KARE 11.

"Lee has told me that he's pretty much given up on life," she told KARE 11.

His son had died in a tragic accident. His home had been destroyed in a storm and was now unlivable. He was alone on his property, in extreme poverty, in a 12-foot camper that had no heat, no running water, and no way to shower or relieve himself.

He was confused, and most troubling, he had no plan for the approaching chilly winter months.

Angela talked to him about his circumstances and left his property that day with an entirely different mission than when she arrived.

Photo by Ivory Hecker/KARE 11.

"Living in this trailer with no heat, no sanitation whatsoever — he has no toilet — no water, nothing, is not acceptable to me," she said.

When she got home, she decided to spread the word. She launched a GoFundMe page with hopes that maybe people in the area would like to know about their fellow community member and help out if possible.

She wrote on the page, "I don't know Lee too well personally, but what I do know is he's kind, likes bluegrass music and used to love to fish. If you can help thank you. If not can you please pray?"

They delivered.

A look at Angela's GoFundMe page. The whole story is there.

In just one month, members of the community not only answered her request, they went the extra mile. More than $30,000 was raised, and hopefully even more is to come.

They all care about fellow Minnesotan Lee Haase, regardless if they know him. That's evident immediately from the comments: Strangers keep popping up with mentions of extra storage units, space heaters, blankets, groceries, gift cards — you name it. They all want to help.

The response has been so overwhelming, the new goal is to build Lee an actual home.

"It's hard to explain [how I feel]," said Lee. "Just pretty awesome."

A home!

To think, the goal started with Lee trying to eat dinner and ended with an entire community rallying around him to help him live a more comfortable, humane life.

One of the comments on the fundraising page reads, "God bless you for starting this, Angela. We need more people like you in the world."

We do need more Angelas in the world, and I think we have them. When we take time to look up once in awhile and think outside of ourselves, anything can happen.

This story is beautiful proof. See more of it from KARE 11's segment.

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

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Officer Stagg meeting Sherry Smith on WISH-TV.

Indianapolis Police Officer Jeff Stagg selflessly maintained the roadside memorial of Shelby Smith, who had been killed by a drunk driver. He picked up trash and placed little plastic flowers, figurines and rocks around it to keep it presentable. Though Shelby died nearly 22 years ago, Officer Stagg didn't want her to be forgotten. And now, his act of kindness won't be forgotten either.

Passerby Kaleb Hall (@kalebhall00 on TikTok) noticed the officer cleaning up the site and asked him what he was doing here. Kaleb had already thought the behavior a little uncharacteristic, "a cop cleaning up trash in the hood," so he went over to inquire.

After explaining that Shelby's memorial was in his patrol area and that he guessed her family had moved away, Officer Stagg told Kaleb, "no one's keeping it up anymore, so I just wanna make sure it stays kept up."

Stagg had noticed the memorial had become surrounded by overgrown grass, weeds and trash. After driving past it every day, Officer Stagg thought enough was enough.


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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."