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Dignity Health old

Usually the best part about getting a pizza delivered is ... the pizza.

Is there anything more beautiful? Photo by Brendan C/Flickr.


For 76-year-old Lee Haase, the best part was who delivered his.

It was pizza delivery driver Angela Nguyen who showed up at his address in Ham Lake, Minnesota, with a pizza one day. I don't think she was expecting the interaction they were about to have.

Photo by Ivory Hecker/KARE 11.

"Lee has told me that he's pretty much given up on life," she told KARE 11.

His son had died in a tragic accident. His home had been destroyed in a storm and was now unlivable. He was alone on his property, in extreme poverty, in a 12-foot camper that had no heat, no running water, and no way to shower or relieve himself.

He was confused, and most troubling, he had no plan for the approaching chilly winter months.

Angela talked to him about his circumstances and left his property that day with an entirely different mission than when she arrived.

Photo by Ivory Hecker/KARE 11.

"Living in this trailer with no heat, no sanitation whatsoever — he has no toilet — no water, nothing, is not acceptable to me," she said.

When she got home, she decided to spread the word. She launched a GoFundMe page with hopes that maybe people in the area would like to know about their fellow community member and help out if possible.

She wrote on the page, "I don't know Lee too well personally, but what I do know is he's kind, likes bluegrass music and used to love to fish. If you can help thank you. If not can you please pray?"

They delivered.

A look at Angela's GoFundMe page. The whole story is there.

In just one month, members of the community not only answered her request, they went the extra mile. More than $30,000 was raised, and hopefully even more is to come.

They all care about fellow Minnesotan Lee Haase, regardless if they know him. That's evident immediately from the comments: Strangers keep popping up with mentions of extra storage units, space heaters, blankets, groceries, gift cards — you name it. They all want to help.

The response has been so overwhelming, the new goal is to build Lee an actual home.

"It's hard to explain [how I feel]," said Lee. "Just pretty awesome."

A home!

To think, the goal started with Lee trying to eat dinner and ended with an entire community rallying around him to help him live a more comfortable, humane life.

One of the comments on the fundraising page reads, "God bless you for starting this, Angela. We need more people like you in the world."

We do need more Angelas in the world, and I think we have them. When we take time to look up once in awhile and think outside of ourselves, anything can happen.

This story is beautiful proof. See more of it from KARE 11's segment.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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You could say Marine biologist, divemaster and National Geographic Explorer Dr. Erika Woolsey is a bit of a coral reef whisperer, one who brings her passion for ocean science to folks on dry land in a fresh, innovative and fun new way using virtual reality.

Images courtesy of Meta’s Community Voices film series

Her non-profit, The Hydrous, combines science, design, and technology to provide one-of-a-kind experiential education about marine life. In 2018, Hydrous produced “Immerse 360”, a virtual underwater journey through the coral reefs of Palau, with Dr. Woolsey as a guide.

Viewers got to swim with sharks, manta rays and sea turtles while exploring gorgeous aquatic landscapes and learning about the crucial role our oceans play—all from 360° and 3D footage captured by VRTUL 2 underwater storytelling VR cameras.


Hydrous then expanded on the idea to develop two more exciting augmented adventures using Meta Quest 2 technology: “Expedition Palau,” a live event where audiences can share a “synchronized immersive reality experience”, which includes live narration from Woolsey, and “Explore,” a “CGI experience” to enjoy the magic of the ocean at home.


www.youtube.com

“I’ve been extremely fortunate to explore and study coral reefs around the world,” Woolsey said, sharing that it was “heartbreaking” to see these important habitats decay so rapidly while the latest scientific reports did not clearly lead to widespread compassionate action.

“How do we care about something we never see or experience?” she reflected. As she discovered, virtual reality would be a powerful solution for eliciting empathy. “VR has the ability to generate presence and agency and make you feel like you’re there. It's that emotional connection that can bridge scientific discovery and public understanding”

The combination of virtual reality and the ocean’s natural breathtaking beauty is, as Woolsey puts it, a “match made in heaven” for getting people more engaged in ocean education. “When you’re floating you can look up and down and all around you…seeing a school of fish surrounding you and reefs in these cathedral-like structures. Rather than watching a video of a scientist, you get to become the scientist.”

Hydrous also has special kits to provide middle school students hands-on learning about ocean life. In addition to a journal, activity cards and a smartphone VR viewer, each kit includes lifelike 3D printed model pieces of a coral reef so that middle school students can try building their own.

These reef models even turn white when temperatures rise inside the aquarium, which mimics the real “bleaching” that corals endure when they die due to higher than normal ocean temperatures. Students really do become scientists as they figure out how to bring color back to their reef.

While it’s true that the health of our oceans affects us all, the growing threats our oceans face—pollution, overfishing, climate change—don’t always affect us on an empathetic level. Through the use of technology, Woolsey has created an innovative way to connect hearts and minds to one of the Earth’s most important resources, which can inspire real and lasting change.

“We can’t bring everybody to the ocean, but we’re finding scalable ways to bring the ocean to everyone.”

To learn more about Hydrous, click here.

via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.


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