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Stephen Fry is a celebrated British actor. He has been diagnosed with bipolar disorder and speaks publicly about his experience to help reduce stigma and encourage others to seek help. This is his story in his own words.

"It came as quite a shock to me to realize that the feelings of suicidal thoughts that I had were actually rare — that these were not the norm. ... I suppose that it as good a time to date it from as any."


All images via The House Partnership.


The least helpful thing anyone can say to a person experiencing depression is that their feelings are somehow less real than those of a person without depression or that they're somehow misinterpreting what's going on in their own head.

When a person is depressed but aware the depression is temporary, it becomes easier to keep fighting through it. The tunnel is a horrible place to be, but when there's a light at the end, it's easier to put one foot in front of the other.

When a person is suicidal, it often has very little to do with what is happening in the present and everything to do with the idea that the future cannot possibly be any better.

The thing that keeps one living is a sense of future.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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It's a cat toy, people. Deal with it.

Kids have relentless curiosity and imagination galore. That magical quality often catches adults off guard in the most hilarious of ways.

Tennis pro Serena Williams recently posted a video to her TikTok showing her 5-year-old daughter Olympia (who is the spitting image of her mother, by the way) playing with a “toy” for their cat Karma.

By “toy,” I mean a tampon.


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via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.


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