Sarah Michelle Gellar just opened up about what it was like struggling with postpartum depression after the 2009 birth of her daughter, Charlotte.

As many as 1 in 7 new mothers will experience postpartum depression, yet it's something that doesn't get talked about nearly enough as the result of some pretty serious shame and stigma. On Instagram, the "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" actress shared her story alongside a heart-meltingly sweet throwback photo of Charlotte (now age 7) as an infant.

"Having kids is wonderful, and life changing, and rarely what you're prepared for. I love my children more than anything in the world. But like a lot of women, I too struggled with postpartum depression after my first baby was born. I got help, and made it through, and every day since has been the best gift I could ever have asked for. To those of you going through this, know that you're not alone and that it really does get better."

Geller was moved to share her story now in light of the current debate around health care reform.

Congress presently is mulling over its options when it comes to what, if anything, it should change about our current system. Some of those plans could mean a return to the days where pre-existing conditions (the definition of which is pretty much up to insurance companies but would likely include things like postpartum depression) could either get you excluded from a plan or charged a higher rate.

Gellar isn't having it and urged people to call their members of Congress and demand coverage:

"And if you believe that postpartum depression should be covered by healthcare, please take a moment and go to callmycongress.com today, find your rep's numbers and let them know. #NotAPreExistingCondition"

Prinze family out!! ✈️✈️

A post shared by Sarah Michelle (@sarahmgellar) on

Gellar was fortunate to get the help and support she needed to get through postpartum depression years ago. Also, thankfully, our current health care system allows those of us who might not be as financially well off as she is to receive that same sort of care. Let's fight to keep it that way.

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