Sarah Michelle Gellar opens up about a challenge many moms face but few discuss.

Sarah Michelle Gellar just opened up about what it was like struggling with postpartum depression after the 2009 birth of her daughter, Charlotte.

As many as 1 in 7 new mothers will experience postpartum depression, yet it's something that doesn't get talked about nearly enough as the result of some pretty serious shame and stigma. On Instagram, the "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" actress shared her story alongside a heart-meltingly sweet throwback photo of Charlotte (now age 7) as an infant.

"Having kids is wonderful, and life changing, and rarely what you're prepared for. I love my children more than anything in the world. But like a lot of women, I too struggled with postpartum depression after my first baby was born. I got help, and made it through, and every day since has been the best gift I could ever have asked for. To those of you going through this, know that you're not alone and that it really does get better."

Geller was moved to share her story now in light of the current debate around health care reform.

Congress presently is mulling over its options when it comes to what, if anything, it should change about our current system. Some of those plans could mean a return to the days where pre-existing conditions (the definition of which is pretty much up to insurance companies but would likely include things like postpartum depression) could either get you excluded from a plan or charged a higher rate.

Gellar isn't having it and urged people to call their members of Congress and demand coverage:

"And if you believe that postpartum depression should be covered by healthcare, please take a moment and go to callmycongress.com today, find your rep's numbers and let them know. #NotAPreExistingCondition"

Prinze family out!! ✈️✈️

A post shared by Sarah Michelle (@sarahmgellar) on

Gellar was fortunate to get the help and support she needed to get through postpartum depression years ago. Also, thankfully, our current health care system allows those of us who might not be as financially well off as she is to receive that same sort of care. Let's fight to keep it that way.

via @jharrisfour / Twitter

The 2021 Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) kicked off in Orlando, Florida on Friday. It's three days of panels and speakers with former President Donald Trump delivering the keynote speech on Sunday night.

It's believed that during the speech Trump will declare himself the Republican frontrunner for the 2024 nomination.

So far, the event has made headlines for a speech by Senator Ted Cruz of Texas who tried his hand at stand-up comedy. "I've got to say, Orlando is awesome," Cruz told the cheering crowd. "It's not as nice as Cancun. But it's nice."

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After years of service as a military nurse in the naval Marine Corps, Los Angeles, California-resident Rhonda Jackson became one of the 37,000 retired veterans in the U.S. who are currently experiencing homelessness — roughly eight percent of the entire homeless population.

"I was living in a one-bedroom apartment with no heat for two years," Jackson said. "The Department of Veterans Affairs was doing everything they could to help but I was not in a good situation."

One day in 2019, Jackson felt a sudden sense of hope for a better living arrangement when she caught wind of the ongoing construction of Veteran's Village in Carson, California — a 51-unit affordable housing development with one, two and three-bedroom apartments and supportive services to residents through a partnership with U.S.VETS.

Her feelings of hope quickly blossomed into a vision for her future when she learned that Veteran's Village was taking applications for residents to move in later that year after construction was complete.

"I was entered into a lottery and I just said to myself, 'Okay, this is going to work out,'" Jackson said. "The next thing I knew, I had won the lottery — in more ways than one."

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This story was originally published on The Mighty.

Most people imagine depression equals “really sad,” and unless you’ve experienced depression yourself, you might not know it goes so much deeper than that. Depression expresses itself in many different ways, some more obvious than others. While some people have a hard time getting out of bed, others might get to work just fine — it’s different for everyone.

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Middle school has to be the most insecure time in a person's life. Kids in their early teens are incredibly cruel and will make fun of each other for not having the right shoes, listening to the right music, or having the right hairstyle.

As if the social pressure wasn't enough, a child that age has to deal with the intensely awkward psychological and biological changes of puberty at the same time.

Jason Smith, the principal of Stonybrook Intermediate and Middle School in Warren Township, Indiana, had a young student sent to his office recently, and his ability to understand his feelings made all the difference.

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