Ruby Rose made history as TV’s first gay superhero and got bullied off Twitter for it.
Photo by Disney/ABC Television Group/Flickr

Australian actor Ruby Rose made history earlier this month after being cast as Batwoman, the first openly-gay superhero to headline a TV series.

The CW is currently developing a Batwoman series scheduled to premiere in the 2019-20 season. Rose identifies as gender fluid and is best known for her roles in “Orange Is the New Black,” “Pitch Perfect 3,” and “John Wick: Chapter 2.”

But Rose’s history-making achievement wasn’t good enough for some people.


There was a huge backlash to Rose’s casting because she doesn’t check off all the same boxes as the character, Kate Kane/Batwoman.

Some fans were angry because Kate Kane is Jewish and Rose is not.

Some believe the casting was made to appease straight women.

Others criticized Rose for her acting ability.

People also argued that the gender-fluid Rose isn't an actual lesbian. Although, Rose begs to differ.

Two days after the casting announcement, Rose deleted her Twitter account and limited comments on her Instagram account to only people she knew.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Rose confronted the attacks on Twitter before deleting her account:

“Where on earth did ‘Ruby is not a lesbian therefore she can’t be batwoman’ come from — has to be the funniest most ridiculous thing I’ve ever read. I came out at 12? And have for the past 5 years had to deal with ‘she’s too gay’ how do y’all flip it like that? I didn’t change. I wish we would all support each other and our journeys.

When women and when minorities join forces we are unstoppable… when we tear each other down it’s much more hurtful than from any group. But hey/ love a challenge I just wish women and the LGBT community supported each other more, My wish was we were all a little kinder and more supportive of each other…Sending everyone my love and gratitude, it’s been a rollercoaster of a year, this month especially.

I am looking forward to getting more than 4 hours of sleep and to break from Twitter to focus all my energy on my next 2 projects. If you need me, I’ll be on my Bat Phone.”

Obviously, it’s important for people of color and the LGBT community to have a voice and be properly represented on television.

Bullying an actor because they don’t have the same exact background as the character they are playing is taking things a step too far.

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

Vanna White appeared on "The Price Is Right" in 1980.

Vanna White has been a household name in the United States for decades, which is kind of hilarious when you consider how she gained her fame and fortune. Since 1982, the former model and actress has made millions walking back and forth turning letters (and later simply touching them—yay technology) on the game show "Wheel of Fortune."

That's it. Walking back and forth in a pretty evening gown, flipping letters and clapping for contestants. More on that job in a minute…

As a member of Gen X, television game shows like "Wheel of Fortune" and "The Price is Right" send me straight back to my childhood. Watching this clip from 1980 of Vanna White competing on "The Price is Right" two years before she started turning letters on "Wheel of Fortune" is like stepping into a time machine. Bob Barker's voice, the theme music, the sound effects—I swear I'm home from school sick, lying on the ugly flowered couch with my mom checking my forehead and bringing me Tang.

This video has it all: the early '80s hairstyles, a fresh-faced Vanna White and Bob Barker's casual sexism that would never in a million years fly today.

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