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aashish lalawade, graduation, parents
via Pixabay

Proud graduates in their caps and gowns.

When Aashish Nalawade graduated from Teesside University, in Middlesbrough, England, last June, no one was more proud of him than his daughter, Shivaee. As Aashish took the stage to accept his diploma, his daughter screamed “Congratulations, daddy” and the whole auditorium burst out in laughter.

After he blew her a kiss and shouted, “I love you” she replied passionately, “I love you, daddy!” Then, the proud father accepted his diploma.

The moment has gone viral on Instagram because it's super adorable and a bit of a role reversal. Usually, we see parents cheering on their children as they graduate, not the other way around. This video shows that kids can be just as proud of their parents as they are of them.


Aashish’s accomplishment was extra special because he moved away from his family to the U.K. to get his master’s degree at the age of 34 after his daughter was born in 2019. "I was hesitant–going back to studies after 10 years felt odd, but my wife's support encouraged me. So I quit again, and began applying. I finally got into a university in the UK," he said according to Tuko.

The family was reunited in the U.K. in August 2020.

Aashish was twice as proud when he received his degree. “My heart melted along with all the others present,” Aashish said of his daughter’s outburst. “Rather than the graduation award, I felt ‘being father to my daughter’ is the biggest accomplishment and achievement to me.”

The video has melted countless hearts on social media, too.

“What a precious and beautiful memory made between a father and daughter! Blessings on your family! Congratulations on your graduation!” Maritza Hernandez wrote on Instagram.

“This seriously made my day. I'm freaking teary-eyed at work. This was just Beautiful. Period," Monica v Sanford added.

All photos courtesy of Biofinity Energys®

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This article originally appeared on 07.11.17


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