Heroes

One thing the Rio Olympics will get right this year: condoms.

Brazil wants all Olympic visitors to have safe, eco-friendly sex.

Rio has had no shortage of problems leading up to the 2016 Olympics, but one problem it definitely won't have is a shortage of condoms.

The Brazilian government plans to distribute 9 million free condoms during the Rio Olympics.


Photo by Yasuyoshi Chiba/Getty Images.

So at least everyone can have safe sex while the country braces for a major recession, watches corruption mount in their government, and muddles through various health crises like the recent Zika outbreak and water contamination incidents.

These aren't ordinary condoms, however. They're doing a lot more than keeping STDs out and accidental Olympics-related pregnancies down.

They're made from sustainably produced wild rubber by a company called Natex that seeks to preserve the rainforest.

Photo by Kambou Sia/Getty Images.

These are the only condoms in the world made from wild rubber.

Before you ask — no, Wild Rubber is not Gumby's new R-rated nickname (sadly). Wild rubber is sourced by local rubber tappers who make a point of preserving the trees from which they're tapping. Because, believe it or not, rubber comes from trees. Really.

Wild rubber has a long history in South America, where Amazonian tapping has been a profession since the 19th century. For decades, rubber tappers have been doing everything they can to stop deforestation and protect their livelihood. Now, thanks to Natex and the Brazilian government, these local rubber tappers have strong support behind them.

The company has enlisted over 700 tree-tapping families to help fulfill its quota of producing 100 million condoms per year.

Photo by Yasuyoshi Chiba/Getty Images.

Natex pays these families far above market value for the rubber they procure — 270% above to be exact. The Natex factory is located in Xapuri in the Amazonian state of Acre, which is also where famous conservationist Chico Mendes was gunned down trying to stop deforestation.

Just to show you how awesome it is that rubber comes from trees, check out these photos of rubber tappers at work:

Making diagonal cuts to release the rubber. Photo by Yasuyoshi Chiba/Getty Images.

It takes all day for the rubber to collect in a bucket. Photo by Yasuyoshi Chiba/Getty Images.

Tappers tap 100 trees a day on average. Photo by Gavin White/Flickr.

Condoms being forged from natural rubber. Photo by Yasuyoshi Chiba/Getty Images.

Sure, wild rubber condoms can't be made as quickly as synthetic condoms, but they're far superior in quality.

They're stronger because they're manufactured with fewer minerals. And, according to Natex, latex made from natural rubber is much smoother. So Olympics enthusiasts in Rio this summer can safely get their freak on without worrying about a faulty condom leading to Zika-related birth defects.

Not to mention Natex's condom factory is providing hundreds of jobs while minimizing its impact on the Amazon.

Brazil may not have it totally together, especially when it comes to the logistics of hosting a worldwide event like the Olympics, but they wrote the book on sustainable prophylactics. As such, they will be doling out the largest condom supply in the history of the Olympic Games.

And since the Olympic villages are infamous for rampant randy behavior, athletes and guests attending this year's Olympic Games may have actually found their most complimentary hosting city.

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