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Family

NFL quarterback making $750,000 a year explains why he prefers living at home with his mom

He loves her chicken cutlets.

tommy devito, new york giants, new jersey

MetLife stadium, home of the New York Giants.

The number of young adults in the U.S. choosing to live with their parents has sharply risen, with 54% of Gen Zers (aged 18 to 25) doing so due to the current economic climate. It makes sense these days because rent is punitively expensive, and inflation has made getting by even more challenging. Add to that, according to a recent story in The New York Post, many adult Gen Zers admit they’re not ready to be “adulting” quite yet.

One high-profile Gen Zer with the money to live on his own but chooses the comfort of living at home with his mother is New York Giants quarterback, 25-year-old Tommy DeVito.

DeVito is an unlikely starter for the Giants after their number one quarterback, Daniel Jones, and backup, Tyrod Taylor, have gone down to injuries. DeVito is just the 10th undrafted rookie to start in the NFL since 2000.


Even though DeVito currently makes $750,000 a year, he prefers to live at home with his mother in Cedar Grove, New Jersey.

"It was a no-brainer for me," DeVito told ESPN about living with his parents. "Everything that I need is there at the house. The decision was made since this level of football is stressful for a rookie, especially from the quarterback position. There is a lot going on, a lot of meetings. So everything outside of football is handled by my family.”

"I don't have to worry about laundry, what I'm eating for dinner, chicken cutlets and all that is waiting for me when I get there,” DeVito continued. “My mom still makes my bed. Everything is handled for me. Honestly, I don't even know if I could find a place closer to here than where I live. It takes me 12 minutes to get here."

DeVito is right about his mom living in a desirable location. Cedar Grove is under 12 miles from the Giants’ home at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey.

Veteran Giants offensive lineman Justin Pugh sees nothing wrong with the starting quarterback from one of the most storied franchises in the NFL living at home with his mother. "That is the greatest. You know what, smart!" Pugh told ESPN. "Saving his money. Genius! That's the one thing I'd say from a financial standpoint. Your mom helping with your wash, making sure you're up on time, no distractions, unbelievable."

DeVito may be onto something when it comes to saving money as a high-paid professional athlete. A startling number of pro athletes go broke after their playing career. One athlete who kept almost every penny he made as a pro athlete with the help of his mom was former NFL wide receiver Darrius Heyward-Bey. DHB, as he is known, kept almost all of the money he made through 10 seasons with the Raiders, Colts and Steelers with the help of his mother, Vivian, an accountant. She kept DHB on a strict budget and invested the rest of his money.

"I get an email [from her] every Tuesday," said Heyward-Bey, who gave his mom a commission for her work. "I can read it over, check it up. I see where the money is going.

“I don't have any kids and I'm not married, so the money I spend is on me. It's really easy to say no to myself," Heyward-Bey continued. "I keep things real simple. I'm not really a flashy guy. I understand what I want to buy. I invest my money well and pay my taxes."

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