Meet the progressive women who won big in last night’s primaries.

The president may not have been on the ballot for these primary elections, but Trumpism certainly lost.

Progressive women — many of whom represent marginalized groups targeted by the president — won races across the South on May 22, securing slots in November's midterms. The victories further cement what many political analysts consider a growing concern for the president and his party: women running in record numbers on platforms that rebuke Trump's policies and rhetoric.

And they're winning many of their races, too.  



Here are four progressive women who won big last night to keep an eye on through November.


1. Stacey Abrams, Georgia

Photo by Jessica McGowan/Getty Images.

Abrams, a former house minority leader of Georgia's General Assembly, became the first black woman to secure a major party nomination for governor in the Peach State. With a win in November, she'd be the country's first black female governor.

Georgia's increasingly purple politics means her campaign — which looked to energize both rural communities of color and younger progressives in Atlanta — has a real shot at success.

2. Lupe Valdez, Texas

Photo by Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images.

Valdez, a Democrat and former Dallas County Sheriff, uprooted the status quo with her runoff win in the Lone Star State, becoming the first Latina and openly lesbian nominee for governor in Texas.

Her platform is focused on, among many things, standing up for immigrant rights, curbing income inequality, and closing the gender wage gap.

3. Amy McGrath, Kentucky

Photo by Vivien Killilea/Getty Images for MAKERS.

McGrath, a former Marine fighter pilot and political newbie, won the Democratic primary in Kentucky's 6th District by prioritizing K-12 education, making health care affordable, and convincing rural voters she'd stand up to special interests in Washington, D.C.

4. Gina Ortiz Jones, Texas

37-year-old Jones may be making all kinds of Texas history come November. If she wins against opponent Republican Will Hurd, she stands to become the first Iraq War veteran, first lesbian, and first Filipina-American to represent Texas in Congress.

Women are running, women are winning, and herstory is being made each step of the way.

"We are writing the next chapter of Georgia's history," Abrams said in her victory speech. "Where no one is unseen, no one is unheard, and no one is uninspired."

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Increasingly customers are looking for more conscious shopping options. According to a Nielsen survey in 2018, nearly half (48%) of U.S. consumers say they would definitely or probably change their consumption habits to reduce their impact on the environment.

But while many consumers are interested in spending their money on products that are more sustainable, few actually follow through. An article in the 2019 issue of Harvard Business Review revealed that 65% of consumers said they want to buy purpose-driven brands that advocate sustainability, but only about 26% actually do so. It's unclear where this intention gap comes from, but thankfully it's getting more convenient to shop sustainably from many of the retailers you already support.

Amazon recently introduced Climate Pledge Friendly, "a new program to help make it easy for customers to discover and shop for more sustainable products." When you're browsing Amazon, a Climate Pledge Friendly label will appear on more than 45,000 products to signify they have one or more different sustainability certifications which "help preserve the natural world, reducing the carbon footprint of shipments to customers," according to the online retailer.

Amazon

In order to distinguish more sustainable products, the program partnered with a wide range of external certifications, including governmental agencies, non-profits, and independent laboratories, all of which have a focus on preserving the natural world.

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Wikiimages by Pixabay, Dr. Jacqueline Antonovich/Twitter

The 1776 Report isn't just bad, it's historically bad, in every way possible.

When journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones published her Pulitzer Prize-winning 1619 Project for The New York Times, some backlash was inevitable. Instead of telling the story of America's creation through the eyes of the colonial architects of our system of government, Hannah-Jones retold it through the eyes of the enslaved Africans who were forced to help build the nation without reaping the benefits of democracy. Though a couple of historical inaccuracies have had to be clarified and corrected, the 1619 Project is groundbreaking, in that it helps give voice to a history that has long been overlooked and underrepresented in our education system.

The 1776 Report, in turn, is a blaring call to return to the whitewashed curriculums that silence that voice.

In September of last year, President Trump blasted the 1619 Project, which he called "toxic propaganda" and "ideological poison" that "will destroy our country." He subsequently created a commission to tell the story of America's founding the way he wanted it told—in the form of a "patriotic education" with all of the dog whistles that that phrase entails.

Mission accomplished, sort of.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.