The president may not have been on the ballot for these primary elections, but Trumpism certainly lost.

Progressive women — many of whom represent marginalized groups targeted by the president — won races across the South on May 22, securing slots in November's midterms. The victories further cement what many political analysts consider a growing concern for the president and his party: women running in record numbers on platforms that rebuke Trump's policies and rhetoric.

And they're winning many of their races, too.  



Here are four progressive women who won big last night to keep an eye on through November.


1. Stacey Abrams, Georgia

Photo by Jessica McGowan/Getty Images.

Abrams, a former house minority leader of Georgia's General Assembly, became the first black woman to secure a major party nomination for governor in the Peach State. With a win in November, she'd be the country's first black female governor.

Georgia's increasingly purple politics means her campaign — which looked to energize both rural communities of color and younger progressives in Atlanta — has a real shot at success.

2. Lupe Valdez, Texas

Photo by Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images.

Valdez, a Democrat and former Dallas County Sheriff, uprooted the status quo with her runoff win in the Lone Star State, becoming the first Latina and openly lesbian nominee for governor in Texas.

Her platform is focused on, among many things, standing up for immigrant rights, curbing income inequality, and closing the gender wage gap.

3. Amy McGrath, Kentucky

Photo by Vivien Killilea/Getty Images for MAKERS.

McGrath, a former Marine fighter pilot and political newbie, won the Democratic primary in Kentucky's 6th District by prioritizing K-12 education, making health care affordable, and convincing rural voters she'd stand up to special interests in Washington, D.C.

4. Gina Ortiz Jones, Texas

37-year-old Jones may be making all kinds of Texas history come November. If she wins against opponent Republican Will Hurd, she stands to become the first Iraq War veteran, first lesbian, and first Filipina-American to represent Texas in Congress.

Women are running, women are winning, and herstory is being made each step of the way.

"We are writing the next chapter of Georgia's history," Abrams said in her victory speech. "Where no one is unseen, no one is unheard, and no one is uninspired."

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via Jeremy Hogan / YouTube

Vauhxx Booker, a civil rights activist from Bloomington, Indiana, claims that a group of white men threatened to lynch him during an altercation on July 4 near Lake Monroe, but he was saved by onlookers who intervened.

Video taken during the incident shows he was held down by a group of men who pinned him to a tree in a wooded area. Booker says that while he was being held down, the men threatened to break his arms, repeatedly said "get a noose," and told his friends to leave the area.

The men later let him go after being confronted by onlookers who gathered at the scene.

The incident began, according to Booker, when he and his friends were making their way to the lake to see the lunar eclipse when a white man on an ATV told them they were trespassing. When Booker and his friends continued to walk to the lake, the man on the ATV and his friends allegedly shouted "white power" at them, which is when things turned violent.

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