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Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan wrote a letter to their daughter. They CC'd Facebook. All of it.

The Facebook founder and his wife share an ambitious vision for their daughter's future.

Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan wrote a letter to their daughter. They CC'd Facebook. All of it.

Mark Zuckerberg just dropped a big announcement on newsfeeds across the planet.

And it's not entirely about the Facebook baby.


No, I'm not talking about Zuckerberg circa 2005. Photo by Mark Zuckerberg.

Yes, the Facebook founder and his wife, Priscilla Chan, just had their first-born child, a baby girl they call Max. And yes, Zuckerberg is setting an important example for American companies, helping them to adopt real family values by offering their employees parental leave.

But there's more. A lot more.

In a 2,492-word letter to Max, Chan and Zuckerberg laid out an ambitious vision for her future and the world's.

All GIFs from the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative.

And all it'll cost them is the low, low price of tens of billions of dollars.

Through the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, the couple will direct the cash value of their Facebook shares toward initiatives that serve two goals: advancing human potential and promoting equality.

"We will give 99% of our Facebook shares — currently about $45 billion — during our lives to advance this mission," they wrote in the letter.

Photo by Brian Solis/Flickr.

Advancing human potential, they say, means fostering personalized learning, curing diseases, developing clean energy, creating global access to the world's body of knowledge through the Internet, and encouraging entrepreneurship.

And to promote equality, they'll fund efforts to eradicate poverty and hunger, establish universal health care, expand opportunities for the historically disadvantaged, and build bridges within communities, between cultures, and among nations.

The Chan-Zuckerberg investments won't cure all that ails the world, but it could help a lot of people.

That said, they know they'll need more than money:

"We know this is a small contribution compared to all the resources and talents of those already working on these issues. But we want to do what we can, working alongside many others."

That's where the rest of us wishful non-billionaires come in.

Money can get ideas off the ground, but there's no guarantee of their success. Zuckerberg knows that all too well from past philanthropic experiments.

But the message they're sending is something worth celebrating.

The world's greatest challenges won't be solved with just a pile of money. It'll take a collective effort of people from every walk of life. And, of course, a pile of money.

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Shanda Lynn Poitra was born and raised on the Turtle Mountain Reservation in Belcourt, North Dakota. She lived there until she was 24 years old when she left for college at the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks.

"Unfortunately," she says, "I took my bad relationship with me. At the time, I didn't realize it was so bad, much less, abusive. Seeing and hearing about abusive relationships while growing up gave me the mentality that it was just a normal way of life."

Those college years away from home were difficult for a lot of reasons. She had three small children — two in diapers, one in elementary school — as well as a full-time University class schedule and a part-time job as a housekeeper.

"I wore many masks back then and clothing that would cover the bruises," she remembers. "Despite the darkness that I was living in, I was a great student; I knew that no matter what, I HAD to succeed. I knew there was more to my future than what I was living, so I kept working hard."

While searching for an elective class during this time, she came across a one-credit, 20-hour IMPACT self-defense class that could be done over a weekend. That single credit changed her life forever. It helped give her the confidence to leave her abusive relationship and inspired her to bring IMPACT classes to other Native women in her community.

I walked into class on a Friday thinking that I would simply learn how to handle a person trying to rob me, and I walked out on a Sunday evening with a voice so powerful that I could handle the most passive attacks to my being, along with physical attacks."

It didn't take long for her to notice the difference the class was making in her life.

"I was setting boundaries and people were either respecting them or not, but I was able to acknowledge who was worth keeping in my life and who wasn't," she says.

Following the class, she also joined a roller derby league where she met many other powerful women who inspired her — and during that summer, she found the courage to leave her abuser.

"As afraid as I was, I finally had the courage to report the abuse to legal authorities, and I had the support of friends and family who provided comfort for my children and I during this time," she says.

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via Matt Radick / Flickr

Joe Biden reversed Donald Trump's ban on transgender people serving in the military earlier this year, allowing the entire LGBTQ community to serve for the first time.

Anti-gay sentiment in the U.S. military goes as far back as 1778 when Lieutenant Frederick Gotthold Enslin was convicted at court-martial on charges of sodomy and perjury. The military would go on to make sodomy a crime in 1920 and worthy of dishonorable discharge.

In 1949 the Department of Defense standardized its anti-LGBT regulations across the military, declaring: "Homosexual personnel, irrespective of sex, should not be permitted to serve in any branch of the Armed Forces in any capacity, and prompt separation of known homosexuals from the Armed Forces is mandatory."

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