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lost wedding ring, Jersey, metal detector, lego man
Photo by Carlos Esteves on Unsplash. Photo by Austris Augusts on Unsplash.

Not all heroes wear capes. Some go around with a metal detector

Imagine: You’re on your honeymoon with your beloved. You celebrate newlywed bliss with a beach day, nothing but listening to the ocean waves while feeling the sand in-between your toes. Euphoria quickly turns to dread, however, as you discover you’ve lost the very important trinket meant to symbolize your undying love—the wedding ring!

Chaos ensues, then resignation. But suddenly, out of nowhere, you receive a message that your ring has been found and recovered by a friendly … Lego man? Talk about an emotional rollercoaster.

Strange as it sounds, this was a very real situation. The Independent reported that Richard Whetter, 44, and his new bride Anne, 42, had been strolling along Portelet Bay in Jersey, Channel Islands, during their honeymoon when Richard realized his wedding ring had gone missing. Not quite used to wearing it yet, Richard had taken the ring off to go swimming, then forgot to put it back on. “My heart sank,” he lamented. For all they knew, the ring was probably long gone, likely picked up and pawned by one the area’s famous Jersey cows.

wedding ring found by lego man metal detectorThis adorable face is up to no good.Giphy

The worried couple alerted the porter at their hotel, who thankfully knew exactly who to contact for such a crisis.


Luckily for the Whetters, Jersey is home to Steve Andrews, a local metal detectorist who is extremely good at what he does. Andrews’ Instagram is full of recovered relics—everything from old coins to vintage WW2 explosive shells.

Turning his passion into service, Andrews regularly offers his metal detecting skills at no charge to those who need help. For each find, he takes a picture of the recovered item next to a Lego replica of himself, metal detector and all. Cause why not?

“I got it as a jokey present from my sister, and it just stuck,” Andrews said, according to Good News Network. “The Lego man is just a nice thing to send to people – I find their item and take a photo as a sort of ‘I’ve found it!’ It certainly does make good news feel even cheerier."

Andrews found the Whetter’s ring after only about 10 minutes, one of his “quickest searches ever completed,” and now Richard and Anne have not only some welcome relief, but an adorable little memento.

Metal detecting is a bit of an obscure hobby, but one with evident benefits (not just counting the potential payoff of certain finds). In addition to getting outdoor exercise, there’s also quite a bit of mental stimulation that goes into the pastime. Metaldetector.com boasts that a hobbyist will learn about geology, biology, electronics and even meteorology as they perfect their treasure-hunting skills. Not to mention the built-in history lessons one could acquire, or the fact that each successful haul can help clean up the environment.

Plus, as this story has shown us, it can help bring people together in heartwarming ways. Keep doing what you do, Steve Andrews! You and your Lego mini-me are making the world a better place, one epic find at a time.

Albert Einstein

One of the strangest things about being human is that people of lesser intelligence tend to overestimate how smart they are and people who are highly intelligent tend to underestimate how smart they are.

This is called the Dunning-Kruger effect and it’s proven every time you log onto Facebook and see someone from high school who thinks they know more about vaccines than a doctor.

The interesting thing is that even though people are poor judges of their own smarts, we’ve evolved to be pretty good at judging the intelligence of others.

“Such findings imply that, in order to be adaptive, first impressions of personality or social characteristics should be accurate,” a study published in the journal Intelligence says. “There is accumulating evidence that this is indeed the case—at least to some extent—for traits such as intelligence extraversion, conscientiousness, openness, and narcissism, and even for characteristics such as sexual orientation, political ideology, or antigay prejudice.”

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This story originally appeared on 08.06.19


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