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Joy

Communications consultant reveals the interview tip that gets her the job every time

It really seals the deal.

jennifer reardon, tiktok, job interviews

Jennifer Reardon shares her question that gets her the job everytime.

Job interviews are one of the most stressful situations people go through. A recent poll of over 2,000 people found that job interviews are the fifth most stressful experience a person can have, right after health and financial problems, family issues and running late.

That’s why it is vital to be prepared to handle any questions you have to field during the interview. You’ll be less nervous and make a better candidate. However, many people never think to have a question prepared for their potential employer at the end of the interview when they ask, “Do you have any questions for us?”

Communications director and consultant Jennifer Reardon, who goes by the name @notjenneeree on TikTok, says that she has the perfect question to ask at that pivotal moment at the end of the interview. And she claims that she got the job every time she’s asked the question.


Reardon has over 48,000 followers on the platform and nearly 3.7 million likes. She talked about her go-to question in a TikTok post and it received over 3.7 million views.

@notjenneeree

SOMEONE ELSE MADE A VIDEO ABOUT HER PROFESSOR GIVING THE SAME ADVICE (tag her I can’t remember who) & I STG THIS IS MY SECRET TRICK AND IT WORKSSSSSSSS TRY IT immediately.

"Every job that I've interviewed for where I've said this, I got the job," she opens her video. "Do your interview, be normal. Before you're done, the last question you're going to ask them is something along the lines of, 'Are there any concerns that you have about me that we can address before we end?'"

Reardon covered her mouth in anticipation and then said:

"They will have concerns, and then that's your time to address them, and then once you're done addressing them, they'll have no concerns,” she added.

It’s a pretty brilliant strategy because you’re taking the opportunity to address any questions they have about you that they may never get to ask. It’s like putting a button on the interview and sealing the deal by addressing any potential objections. If they have other unresolved issues with candidates, you’re in a much better position to get the gig.

The video inspired countless others on TikTok to share interview questions that have worked for them in the past.

"My favorite question along these lines is 'When thinking about your top performers, what skills and qualities make them stand out?' They eat it UP," Maura replied.

Mateo has a fool-proof line: "It’s 'based on our conversation do u have any reservations about me moving to the next round?' There’s ur answer too if u got the job.”

"I DID THIS!” Sadwook wrote in response to Reardon’s video. “I heard it on TikTok and tried it in the final panel interview with the job I really wanted and they went feral lmao."

Another added the question of all questions: “I always say 'Can I have the job?' and 90 percent of the time I get it."

Obviously, you will need more than one line to guarantee you get a job on your next interview. However, Reardon’s suggestion is a solid reminder that a job interview isn’t just about selling yourself. It’s about addressing your potential employer’s needs as well.

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