Imagine you're stuck with no clean water. You'd want this new paper.

Give a man a bottle of water, he drinks clean water for a day.

GIF from ABC News.


Give a man The Drinkable Book, he drinks clean water for four years.

750 million people around the world don't have access to clean water — that's 1 out of every 9 people. As a result, more than 3.4 million people die every year from diseases caused by bacteria in water. That's a lot of preventable deaths.

Which is why Dr. Theresa Dankovich, the chemist who's behind The Drinkable Book, has spent years committed to finding a fix. When ad agency DDB introduced her to the organization Water Is Life, a beautiful relationship was born.

Image via TheGiftOfWater/YouTube.

This groundbreaking book puts a life-saving solution directly in the hands of people who need it most.

It's functional.

The pages are coated in silver nanoparticles that kill 99.9% of bacteria like typhoid, cholera, and E. coli. Every page you tear from the book serves as a filter that you place in a pan (which doubles as the book's case). Pour contaminated water through the filtered pan, and what comes out is safe, drinkable water. How cool is that?

GIF via TheGiftOfWater/YouTube.

It's educational. And multilingual.

On each page of the book are tips on simple measures (printed in food-grade ink) that folks can take to decrease the chances of contamination and ensure drinking water is clean. You can only use the pages once, but the knowledge they give can last forever.

It plays well with others.

You might have noticed that the world is really ... big. And diverse. With so many different types of people, languages, diseases, land, and water, it's not always a sure bet that one solution can work across the board. But this book is tackling differences. From tests in South Africa to Ghana and Bangladesh, the pages are getting the job done.

And it doesn't break the bank!

In a world where 20% of people live on less than $1 a day, an affordable solution is vital. Fortunately, the creators of the book say it costs only pennies to produce — ensuring that cost won't be a barrier to its use.

It's almost like this book can do it all ... except pay for itself.

The Drinkable Book has proven to be a game-changer. But the folks behind it need the resources to amp up production so they can get it in the hands of the people who need it around the world.

That's why the creator of the The Drinkable Book and Water Is Life teamed up to ask for help through Indiegogo.

Learn more about this revolutionary book here:

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With the COVID-19 pandemic upending her community, Brooklyn-based singer Tiffany Obi turned to healing those who had lost loved ones the way she knew best — through music.

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