Imagine if every school played this Kid President 'pep talk' before class.
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Target First Day Of School

This article originally appeared on 08.27.15


Wisdom comes with age, huh? Don't try telling that to Kid President.

The kid's on fire in this insightful and funny pep talk that we can all most definitely take something from.

Kid President doesn't claim to know it all, but he does know a few things.

And I tell you what, if you wake up in the morning with at least one of these five things on your mind, I bet you'll conquer your day. Kid President tested. Kid President approved.


1. You matter. Don't let anyone make you think differently.

We are all unique and weird and amazing in our own ways. Sure you'll have your ups and downs, but keep that head up. YOU matter.

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It's science, man! And also, you are great.

2. Being a bully is dumb. Don't do it.

Be nice instead. It'll take you further in life, and someday you'll look back on the bullies that you've known and think, "They wasted so much time being horrible to others. No wonder they're still living in their mom's basement!"

Ain't nobody got time for bullies.

3. History is made by ordinary people — like you and me and Justin Timberlake!

If you have an idea that you love, go for it. You never know what'll happen. Maybe you'll invent something or write the next hit song. It's up to you!

Ordinary people who aren't afraid to try (and fail sometimes, too!).

4. If you want to change the world, you'll need to know about it first.

Life is one big school. Rule #1? You gotta show up! Listen, read, ask questions, and most importantly: Be present!

Eek. Can you imagine?

5. Is there a teacher or person in your life who inspires you? Let them know.

Don't let those who've helped you in life go about their days not knowing it. Tell them how much they mean to you. Text them. Call them. Tell them in person. Heck, even write on their Facebook wall! It'll make their day. Promise.

You heard the kid!

It's true: No matter who you are, somebody is learning from you. Everybody is a teacher, and everybody is a student.

So what do you want to teach the world? What do you want to learn? Find out and go do it!

And maybe share this to inspire those around you to do the same. Because honestly, we are so much better when we're being our very best together.

That first car is a rite of passage into adulthood. Specifically, the hard-earned lesson of expectations versus reality. Though some of us are blessed with Teslas at 17, most teenagers receive a car that’s been … let’s say previously loved. And that’s probably a good thing, considering nearly half of first-year drivers end up in wrecks. Might as well get the dings on the lemon, right?

Of course, wrecks aside, buying a used car might end up costing more in the long run after needing repairs, breaking down and just a general slew of unexpected surprises. But hey, at least we can all look back and laugh.

My first car, for example, was a hand-me-down Toyota of some sort from my mother. I don’t recall the specific model, but I definitely remember getting into a fender bender within the first week of having it. She had forgotten to get the brakes fixed … isn’t that a fun story?

Jimmy Fallon recently asked his “Tonight Show” audience on Twitter to share their own worst car experiences. Some of them make my brake fiasco look like cakewalk (or cakedrive, in this case). Either way, these responses might make us all feel a little less alone. Or at the very least, give us a chuckle.

Here are 22 responses with the most horsepower:

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Joy

Man uses TikTok to offer 'dinner with dad' to any kid that needs one, even adult ones

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud.

Come for the food, stay for the wholesomeness.

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud. His TikTok channel is dedicated to giving people intimate conversations they might long to have with their own father, but can’t. The most popular is his “Dinner With Dad” segment.

The concept is simple: Clayton, aka Dad, always sets down two plates of food. He always tells you what’s for dinner. He always blesses the food. He always checks in with how you’re doing.

I stress the stability here, because as someone who grew up with a less-than-stable relationship with their parents, it stood out immediately. I found myself breathing a sigh of relief at Clayton’s consistency. I also noticed the immediate emotional connection created just by being asked, “How was your day?” According to relationship coach and couples counselor Don Olund, these two elements—stability and connection—are fundamental cravings that children have of their parents. Perhaps we never really stop needing it from them.


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TikTok about '80s childhood is a total Gen X flashback.

As a Gen X parent, it's weird to try to describe my childhood to my kids. We're the generation that didn't grow up with the internet or cell phones, yet are raising kids who have never known a world without them. That difference alone is enough to make our 1980s childhoods feel like a completely different planet, but there are other differences too that often get overlooked.

How do you explain the transition from the brown and orange aesthetic of the '70s to the dusty rose and forest green carpeting of the '80s if you didn't experience it? When I tell my kids there were smoking sections in restaurants and airplanes and ashtrays everywhere, they look horrified (and rightfully so—what were we thinking?!). The fact that we went places with our friends with no quick way to get ahold of our parents? Unbelievable.

One day I described the process of listening to the radio, waiting for my favorite song to come on so I could record it on my tape recorder, and how mad I would get when the deejay talked through the intro of the song until the lyrics started. My Spotify-spoiled kids didn't even understand half of the words I said.

And '80s hair? With the feathered bangs and the terrible perms and the crunchy hair spray? What, why and how?

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