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Husband fulfills pregnant wife's every food craving—from rice crispy sliders to 'sweetdogs'

Pregnancy cravings can leave expectant mothers fantasizing about the strangest culinary concoctions.

kay and tay tiktok, kay and tay, pregnancy, pregnancy cravings
@kayandtayofficial/TikTok

They should really make a cookbook.

Pregnancy cravings can leave expectant mothers fantasizing about the strangest culinary concoctions.

It goes so far beyond pickles and ice cream—women might find themselves pulling up to a McDonald’s drive thru when previously they never ate red meat, piling different forms of dairy products onto one another, dipping Cheetos into literally everything.

And that’s not even accounting for the non-food cravings that some women report having, like laundry detergent, chalk, paper, dirt. Yum.

And while cravings are a natural part of pregnancy—caused by the body seeking certain nutrients or to balance out dopamine levels—it doesn’t make them any less of a wild ride.


The couple have all kinds of wholesome glimpses into their relationship. But since Kay became pregnant with baby number two, most of their content has been centered around documenting their pregnancy journey.

Which brings us to—pregnancy cravings. Tay provides us with a bit of backstory:

Since Kay’s pregnancy began, her cravings have been such an adventure, leading to some unique and sweet concoction“ he wrote on their account. “I’ve made it my mission to fulfill her every craving because there’s nothing I love more than seeing her first bite reaction.”

For example: in the video below, Kay dreams up a “pickle split.” A cut pickle. Ice cream. Chocolate AND caramel drizzle. Reese sprinkled on top. But also actual sprinkles sprinkled on top for “some color.”

Seeing Kay get so excited as she meticulously describes exactly how this recipe should unfold is hilarious. But hearing Tay get equally excited to bring her vision to life is what makes it so sweet.

Watch:

@kayandtayofficial She went through so many emotions when she took the first bite! 😂 Backstory ::: Since Kay’s pregnancy began, her cravings have been such an adventure, often leading to some unique and sweet concoctions! I’ve made it my mission to fulfill her every craving because there’s nothing I love more than seeing her first bite reaction. She sure is keeping life exciting these last few months of her pregnancy. ❤️ #kayandtayofficial #couples #relationships #pregnant ♬ original sound - ✨Kay and Tay✨

Kay has since developed a special knack for thinking of ways to turn regular foods into sweet and salty desserts.

You know, things like nachos, hotdogs, sliders…Always with Reese’s. Always with caramel and chocolate drizzle. Because why not.

With every new recipe, Tay goes all out to follow his wife’s instructions to a t. And honestly, who can blame him, when Kay has the best reactions to getting exactly what she wants. Especially the eye twitch.

Enjoy a delicious sampling below:

@kayandtayofficial I was on the edge of my seat waiting to see if she was going to like it or not! 😳 Apparently this was the best craving idea that she has had yet! 😂 she said that she knew it was going to taste good, but this was way better than she expected. I’m always anxiously waiting for her reaction to see if it’s good or bad! 😂 I’m not sure how Kay comes up with these ideas, but they are always so tasty! It’s so funny how she will literally come bursting out of the most random places talking about her cravings! ❤️ #kayandtayofficial #couples #relationships #pregnant ♬ original sound - ✨Kay and Tay✨
@kayandtayofficial Judging by her reaction at the end, I don’t know, maybe she liked it? 😂 Backstory ::: Ever since Kay got pregnant, she has felt many cravings for certain food. While it’s often random and weird, it is almost always sweets! 😂🍫 She builds up the most random recipes in her mind and then “HAS” to have them! I really love doing things for her, so I’m always down to help her make her craving! This one actually turned out really tasty! #kayandtayofficial #couples #relationships #pregnant ♬ original sound - ✨Kay and Tay✨
@kayandtayofficial I’m always anxiously waiting for her reaction to see if it’s good or bad! 😂 I don’t know where Kay comes up with these cravings, but it always tastes so good! She literally will come bursting out of the most random places talking about her cravings! 😂 She should really write a cookbook or something! 🤔 Also, she ended up not having a stomach ache so thats good! 😅 Oh! and if you are new to our pregnancy journey, we have a lot of other cravings and experiences on our page! 😁 #kayandtayofficial #couples #relationships #pregnant ♬ original sound - ✨Kay and Tay✨

If you find yourself craving some of these munchie meals, you’re not alone. The comments sections for every single one of Kay and Tay’s craving videos is filled with people calling for an actual cookbook of their creations.

"Can't lie...I'm not opposed to trying this," one viewer wrote.

Another added, "I'm not pregnant but you're onto something here."

And of course, people found the way Tay supported his wife even sweeter than the treats themselves.

Follow along on even more of Kay and Tay’s crazy craving adventures on TikTok.

Photo by Eliott Reyna on Unsplash

Gen Z is navigating a career landscape unlike any other.

True

Every adult generation has its version of a “kids these days” lament, labeling the up-and-coming generation as less resilient or hardworking compared to their own youth. But Gen Z—currently middle school age through young adulthood—is challenging that notion with their career readiness.

Take Abigail Sanders, an 18-year-old college graduate. Thanks to a dual enrollment program with her online school, she actually earned her bachelor’s degree before her high school diploma. Now she’s in medical school at Bastyr University in Washington state, on track to become a doctor by age 22.

a family of 6 at a graduation with two graduatesAll four of the Sanders kids have utilized Connections Academy to prepare for their futures.

Abigail’s twin sister, Chloe, also did dual enrollment in high school to earn her associate’s in business and is on an early college graduation path to become a vet tech.

Maeson Frymire dreams of becoming a paramedic. He got his EMT certification in high school and fought fires in New Mexico after graduation. Now he’s working towards becoming an advanced certified EMT and has carved his career path towards flight paramedicine.

Sidny Szybnski spends her summers helping run her family’s log cabin resort on Priest Lake in Idaho. She's taken business and finance courses in high school and hopes to be the third generation to run the resort after attending college.

log cabin resort on edge of forestAfter college, Sidny Szybnski hopes to run her family's resort in Priest Lake, Idaho.

Each of these learners has attended Connections Academy, tuition-free online public schools available in 29 states across the U.S., to not only get ready for college but to dive straight into college coursework and get a head start on career training as well. These students are prime examples of how Gen Zers are navigating the career prep landscape, finding their passions, figuring out their paths and making sure they’re prepared for an ever-changing job market.

Lorna Bryant, the Head of Career Education for Connections Academy’s online school program, says that Gen Z has access to a vast array of career-prep tools that previous generations didn’t have, largely thanks to the internet.

“Twenty to 30 years ago, young people largely relied on what adults told them about careers and how to get there,” Bryant tells Upworthy. “Today, teens have a lot more agency. With technology and social media, they have access to so much information about jobs, employers and training. With a tap on their phones, they can hear directly from people who are in the jobs they may be interested in. Corporate websites and social media accounts outline an organization’s mission, vision and values—which are especially important for Gen Z.”

Research shows over 75% of high schoolers want to focus on skills that will prepare them for in-demand jobs. However, not all teens know what the options are or where to find them. Having your future wide open can be overwhelming, and young people might be afraid of making a wrong choice that will impact their whole lives.

Bryant emphasizes that optimism and enthusiasm from parents can help a lot, in addition to communicating that nothing's carved in stone—kids can change paths if they find themselves on one that isn’t a good fit.

Dr. Bryant and student video meeting Dr. Bryant meeting with a student

“I think the most important thing to communicate to teens is that they have more options than ever to pursue a career,” she says. “A two- or four-year college continues to be an incredibly valuable and popular route, but the pathways to a rewarding career have changed so much in the past decade. Today, career planning conversations include options like taking college credit while still in high school or earning a career credential or certificate before high school graduation. There are other options like the ‘ships’—internships, mentorships, apprenticeships—that can connect teens to college, careers, and employers who may offer on-the-job training or even pay for employees to go to college.”

Parents can also help kids develop “durable skills”—sometimes called “soft” or “human” skills—such as communication, leadership, collaboration, empathy and grit. Bryant says durable skills are incredibly valuable because they are attractive to employers and colleges and transfer across industries and jobs. A worldwide Pearson survey found that those skills are some of the most sought after by employers.

“The good news is that teens are likely to be already developing these skills,” says Bryant. Volunteering, having a part-time job, joining or captaining a team sport can build durable skills in a way that can also be highlighted on college and job applications.

Young people are navigating a fast-changing world, and the qualities, skills and tools they need to succeed may not always be familiar to their parents and grandparents. But Gen Z is showing that when they have a good grasp of the options and opportunities, they’re ready to embark on their career paths, wherever they may lead.

Learn more about Connections Academy here and Connections’ new college and career prep initiative here.

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