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How is an anxiety attack like a haunted house? One poet will tell you.

"This is the part of the story when everyone is telling you to RUN." — Brenna Twohy

How is an anxiety attack like a haunted house? One poet will tell you.

Getting people who don't suffer from anxiety issues to understand them is hard.

People have tried countless metaphors and methods to describe what panic and anxiety is like. But putting it into the context of a living nightmare, haunted house style, is one of the more effective ways I've ever seen it done.

Brenna Twohy delivered the riveting poetic analogy recently in Oakland, starting out by going off about some funny "Goosebumps" plots. It's lovely, funny, sweet, and relatable, and it's totally worth the short time to watch.


Here are some of the quick highlights:

Just like an R.L. Stine book, anxiety can play tricks on your mind.

Panic is a poltergeist.

"When I tell you that panic is a stubborn phantom, that she will grab onto me and not let go for months."

And the truth of how hard it can be to find someone who wants to sign up for your baggage.

When curious people try to show interest in your haunted head, it can seem more like voyeurism.

"When you say 'tell me about the bad days' it sounds like all the neighborhood kids daring each other to ring the doorbell."

But there's more where that came from, and she ends on a hopeful note. She's really pretty brilliant.

Feeling like she nailed it? Your friends may appreciate her take on it, too.

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One little girl took pictures of her school lunches. The Internet responded — and so did the school.

If you listened to traditional news media (and sometimes social media), you'd begin to think the Internet and technology are bad for kids. Or kids are bad for technology. Here's a fascinating alternative idea.

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Norton

This article originally appeared on 03.31.15

Kids can innovate, create, and imagine in ways that are fresh and inspiring — when we "allow" them to do so, anyway. Despite the tendency for parents to freak out because their kids are spending more and more time with technology in schools, and the tendency for schools themselves to set extremely restrictive limits on the usage of such technology, there's a solid argument for letting them be free to imagine and then make it happen.

It's not a stretch to say the kids in this video are on the cutting edge. Some of the results he talks about in the video at the bottom are quite impressive.

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