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Find Out The Fastest And Saddest Way To Shrink A Child's Heart. Literally.

It turns out there are a lot of really serious side effects to one of the most common issues plaguing the world.

Find Out The Fastest And Saddest Way To Shrink A Child's Heart. Literally.

Approximately 805 million people in the world do not have enough food to lead a healthy active life. That's about 1 in 9 people on earth. And that stat gets even sadder when you understand all of the impacts of malnutrition on the body — especially on a child.

Hunger affects the brain.

A healthy brain uses 20% of the body's energy that comes from food. Not enough food means not enough energy for the brain to function properly.


Imagine how well a starved brain can do in the classroom. And yet 66 million primary-school children attend classes hungry across the developing world.

Then there's the heart.

This is the information that actually hurt my heart just to think about. A healthy heart pumps blood steadily throughout the body.

The heart of a hungry child actually shrinks.

Therefore it has to work extra hard to pump enough blood, which in turn affects almost every other organ inside the body. Which means, you guessed it:

Hunger damages vital organs — and the immune system.

With weakened immune systems, it's no wonder that poor nutrition causes nearly half (45%) of deaths in children under 5 each year.

The impacts of hunger show on the outside of the body with cracked, unhealthy skin (allowing for increased risk of infection) and on the inside of the body, where malnourished children's bones actually stop growing.

1 out of 6 children — roughly 100 million — in developing countries is underweight.

With all of these side effects, it's no wonder the impacts of malnutrition are so serious and so long-lasting that the best solution is really the only solution:

Stop hunger before it starts.

Check out the video below to see how World Vision recommends we catch world hunger and save the minds, hearts, and bodies of millions of children all around the world.

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As millions of Americans have raced to receive the COVID-19 vaccine, millions of others have held back. Vaccine hesitancy is nothing new, of course, especially with new vaccines, but the information people use to weigh their decisions matters greatly. When choices based on flat-out wrong information can literally kill people, it's vital that we fight disinformation every which way we can.

Researchers at the Center for Countering Digital Hate, a not-for-profit non-governmental organization dedicated to disrupting online hate and misinformation, and the group Anti-Vax Watch performed an analysis of social media posts that included false claims about the COVID-19 vaccines between February 1 and March 16, 2021. Of the disinformation content posted or shared more than 800,000 times, nearly two-thirds could be traced back to just 12 individuals. On Facebook alone, 73% of the false vaccine claims originated from those 12 people.

Dubbed the "Disinformation Dozen," these 12 anti-vaxxers have an outsized influence on social media. According to the CCDH, anti-vaccine accounts have a reach of more than 59 million people. And most of them have been spreading disinformation with impunity.

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Photo by Daniel Schludi on Unsplash
True

The global eradication of smallpox in 1980 is one of international public health's greatest successes. But in 1966, seven years after the World Health Organization announced a plan to rid the world of the disease, smallpox was still widespread. The culprits? A lack of funds, personnel and vaccine supply.

Meanwhile, outbreaks across South America, Africa, and Asia continued, as the highly contagious virus continued to kill three out of every 10 people who caught it, while leaving many survivors disfigured. It took a renewed commitment of resources from wealthy nations to fulfill the promise made in 1959.

Forty-one years later, although we face a different virus, the potential for vast destruction is just as great, and the challenges of funding, personnel and supply are still with us, along with last-mile distribution. Today, while 30% of the U.S. population is fully vaccinated, with numbers rising every day, there is an overwhelming gap between wealthy countries and the rest of the world. It's becoming evident that the impact on the countries getting left behind will eventually boomerang back to affect us all.

Photo by ismail mohamed - SoviLe on Unsplash

The international nonprofit CARE recently released a policy paper that lays out the case for U.S. investment in a worldwide vaccination campaign. Founded 75 years ago, CARE works in over 100 countries and reaches more than 90 million people around the world through multiple humanitarian aid programs. Of note is the organization's worldwide reputation for its unshakeable commitment to the dignity of people; they're known for working hand-in-hand with communities and hold themselves to a high standard of accountability.

"As we enter into our second year of living with COVID-19, it has become painfully clear that the safety of any person depends on the global community's ability to protect every person," says Michelle Nunn, CARE USA's president and CEO. "While wealthy nations have begun inoculating their populations, new devastatingly lethal variants of the virus continue to emerge in countries like India, South Africa and Brazil. If vaccinations don't effectively reach lower-income countries now, the long-term impact of COVID-19 will be catastrophic."

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