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Ever wonder what kind of men harass women online? Researchers found out.

Just in case you needed another reason to not be a sore loser.

Ever wonder what kind of men harass women online? Researchers found out.

We all enjoy winning, but nobody likes a sore loser.

Been there. GIF from "Modern Family."


Unfortunately, two scientists found a group of men who did not get the memo.

Researchers from University of New South Wales and Miami University logged into the uber-popular video game Halo 3 and observed 163 games to see how the players treated each other.

The gender breakdown in how players treated each other probably won't surprise you. All the men treated each other fairly wellwhile a small subset of men treated the few women players like crap. Turns out everyone is pretty nice to each other — except the male losers. They felt some kind of way about it and took it out on the female players.

Sticks and bones may break my bones but so could being punched like this. GIF from Halo 3.

The men that were the worst players were the ones that treated women badly — so they can feel "manly" again.

To put this in perspective: The men who were good at the game were nice to everyone, regardless of the gender of their co-players. So, the better the player, the nicer the man. The harassers were only nice to other men.

It turns out that the harassers wanted to make up for their poor performance — and feel like a "man" again.

They didn't get the memo that women are gamers, too, and felt angry that women were in "their" space. And then to add insult to injury, the men — gasp — were losing to these ladies. Unfortunately, they turned to a harmful quick fix for their fragile male egos and lashed out in an attempt to assert some sort of dominance.

They couldn't handle that they were losing to a girl. Talk about sore losers.

This is how I envision the harassers they realized that they're losing. Photo by rhinman/Flickr.

The behavior of these sore losers gives us insight into the world of harassment on the Internet where there's a lot — a whole lot — of it. And women experience the worst of it.

The Pew Research Center released a report last year stating that 40% of people on the Internet have experienced harassment. Kids, LGBTQ people, people with disabilities, people of color. The list is endless. The report also found young women (ages 18-24) are disproportionately targeted for severe forms of online harassment, including stalking and consistent harassment.

Just a typical day of being a woman on the Internet. Original photo by thefasterdanish/Flickr.

The study shows the dangers of toxic masculinity for both women and men.

"Toxic masculinity" is a term often used to refer to a group of beliefs that are anchored to the idea that men must be violent, unemotional, aggressive, etc. to prove their worth in society. Pretty crappy, right? It doesn't just hurt the people who are subjected to the behavior, the pressure to perform these negative behaviors hurt men, too.

The researchers noted that "men often rely on aggression to maintain their dominant social status," and they think that the harassment is an attempt to distance themselves from being seen as equal to women.

We need to stop equating aggressive behavior with manhood and superior status so we can teach young men that losing to women isn't a big deal.

I get it. Losing sucks. There's a reason why I never play Monopoly. I get my butt whooped every time. But the gender of the person who beat you shouldn't have an effect on your reaction to it.

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

via @Todd_Spence / Twitter

Seven years ago, Bill Murray shared a powerful story about the importance of art. The revelation came during a discussion at the National Gallery in London for the release of 2014's "The Monuments Men." The film is about a troop of soldiers on a mission to recover art stolen by the Nazis.

After his first time performing on stage in Chicago, Murray was so upset with himself that he contemplated taking his own life.

"I wasn't very good, and I remember my first experience, I was so bad I just walked out — out onto the street and just started walking," he said.

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