Emma Watson's latest looks are turning heads thanks to her eco-friendly clothes and accessories.

She's a celebrated actress, Brown graduate, and a United Nations Goodwill Ambassador.

Now, Emma Watson is lending her celebrity to another worthy cause: sustainable fashion.


Photo by Anthony Harvey/Getty Images.

Sustainable fashion is right at the intersection of social responsibility and environmentalism. It's all about developing high-quality clothing and accessories that are made ethically using renewable, recycled, or sustainable resources and materials.

Why is it so awesome? Sustainable fashion can stimulate economic growth, save valuable resources, and give old products new life. It's a win for the fashion industry and the world. Just ask Watson. She's a huge advocate of the growing industry.

Watson has championed socially conscious fashion for years, even launching her own collection.

In 2010, Watson teamed up with the fair-trade and organic clothier People Tree to release a small collection of clothing and home goods. Her 24-item collection used upcycled materials and organic cotton, and it was stitched, woven, and embroidered by fair-trade groups.

She even traveled to Bangladesh to meet the makers behind People Tree and learn more about fair-trade practices.


This month, she's taking part in the Green Carpet Challenge, an effort to bring sustainable fashion front and center.

Developed by the sustainability consulting firm Eco Age, the Green Carpet Challenge is a large-scale collaboration between high-end fashion houses (think Gucci, Armani, Lanvin) and buzzworthy celebrities. And right now, celebrities like Watson, Cate Blanchett, and Colin Firth are helping sustainable fashion take center stage at high-profile events.

Watson on the red carpet in Madrid wearing all sustainable clothes and accessories. Photo by Gerard Julien/AFP/Getty Images.

Watson is working with her stylist to wear a new sustainable look every day of her latest press tour.

With the help of her stylist, Sarah Slutsky, Watson is going head to toe (or, rather, earrings to shoes) in eco-friendly, socially conscious looks while she promotes her new film, "Regression."


First day of Regression press off to an incredible start. Obsessed with this @ralphlauren look made only better by the company's long standing commitment to not use fur products. Jewels by @cartier who is committed to responsible and sustainable business principles and practices in both the supply chain and their own business. Shoes by @paulandrew are all handmade in Italy by artisans who have been making shoes for decades-- some for generations And of course hair by the lovely @visapyyapy and makeup but by brilliant @charlottehayward @emmawatson
A photo posted by Sarah Slutsky (@sarahslutsky) on


Slutsky is posting Watson's outfits to Instagram daily, tagging the designers and brands, and sharing details about their sustainable practices.

Television junket continues! Love this chic little @Erdemlondon dress created from fabrics sourced in Italy and produced in Portugal! The suppliers and producers of these bad-ass boots by @Alexawagnershoes are located in Milan. Alexa Wagner is proud of their quality control systems, the excellent workspace and atmosphere provided for their employees. Jewels from @MoniquePean who strives to raise awareness of art, culture and global environmental issues through design, and is committed to partnering with artisans around the world to support traditional craftsmanship. Love this Feminine/Masculin Bag (because traits of both is beautiful!) by @clarevivier who roots herself in the Los Angeles design community, where her line has been made exclusively since 2008. Team on #beauty @charlottehayward @visapyyapy 💁 @emmawatson
A photo posted by Sarah Slutsky (@sarahslutsky) on


And you don't need to be a celebrity to rock socially conscious duds.

If you want to do your part but can't afford clothes from high-end fashion houses, you're in luck: there are many up-and-coming brands and designers focusing on sustainable options that are affordable.

A woman works at Timbuk2 in San Francisco, making jackets and iPad sleeves out of leather salvaged from old luxury cars. Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images.

Supporting these makers is easier than ever before. From recycled jeans to hemp tank tops, there's something for everyone who wants a more socially conscious closet.

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