She's a celebrated actress, Brown graduate, and a United Nations Goodwill Ambassador.

Now, Emma Watson is lending her celebrity to another worthy cause: sustainable fashion.


Photo by Anthony Harvey/Getty Images.

Sustainable fashion is right at the intersection of social responsibility and environmentalism. It's all about developing high-quality clothing and accessories that are made ethically using renewable, recycled, or sustainable resources and materials.

Why is it so awesome? Sustainable fashion can stimulate economic growth, save valuable resources, and give old products new life. It's a win for the fashion industry and the world. Just ask Watson. She's a huge advocate of the growing industry.

Watson has championed socially conscious fashion for years, even launching her own collection.

In 2010, Watson teamed up with the fair-trade and organic clothier People Tree to release a small collection of clothing and home goods. Her 24-item collection used upcycled materials and organic cotton, and it was stitched, woven, and embroidered by fair-trade groups.

She even traveled to Bangladesh to meet the makers behind People Tree and learn more about fair-trade practices.


This month, she's taking part in the Green Carpet Challenge, an effort to bring sustainable fashion front and center.

Developed by the sustainability consulting firm Eco Age, the Green Carpet Challenge is a large-scale collaboration between high-end fashion houses (think Gucci, Armani, Lanvin) and buzzworthy celebrities. And right now, celebrities like Watson, Cate Blanchett, and Colin Firth are helping sustainable fashion take center stage at high-profile events.

Watson on the red carpet in Madrid wearing all sustainable clothes and accessories. Photo by Gerard Julien/AFP/Getty Images.

Watson is working with her stylist to wear a new sustainable look every day of her latest press tour.

With the help of her stylist, Sarah Slutsky, Watson is going head to toe (or, rather, earrings to shoes) in eco-friendly, socially conscious looks while she promotes her new film, "Regression."


First day of Regression press off to an incredible start. Obsessed with this @ralphlauren look made only better by the company's long standing commitment to not use fur products. Jewels by @cartier who is committed to responsible and sustainable business principles and practices in both the supply chain and their own business. Shoes by @paulandrew are all handmade in Italy by artisans who have been making shoes for decades-- some for generations And of course hair by the lovely @visapyyapy and makeup but by brilliant @charlottehayward @emmawatson
A photo posted by Sarah Slutsky (@sarahslutsky) on


Slutsky is posting Watson's outfits to Instagram daily, tagging the designers and brands, and sharing details about their sustainable practices.

Television junket continues! Love this chic little @Erdemlondon dress created from fabrics sourced in Italy and produced in Portugal! The suppliers and producers of these bad-ass boots by @Alexawagnershoes are located in Milan. Alexa Wagner is proud of their quality control systems, the excellent workspace and atmosphere provided for their employees. Jewels from @MoniquePean who strives to raise awareness of art, culture and global environmental issues through design, and is committed to partnering with artisans around the world to support traditional craftsmanship. Love this Feminine/Masculin Bag (because traits of both is beautiful!) by @clarevivier who roots herself in the Los Angeles design community, where her line has been made exclusively since 2008. Team on #beauty @charlottehayward @visapyyapy 💁 @emmawatson
A photo posted by Sarah Slutsky (@sarahslutsky) on


And you don't need to be a celebrity to rock socially conscious duds.

If you want to do your part but can't afford clothes from high-end fashion houses, you're in luck: there are many up-and-coming brands and designers focusing on sustainable options that are affordable.

A woman works at Timbuk2 in San Francisco, making jackets and iPad sleeves out of leather salvaged from old luxury cars. Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images.

Supporting these makers is easier than ever before. From recycled jeans to hemp tank tops, there's something for everyone who wants a more socially conscious closet.

From Your Site Articles

That first car is a rite of passage into adulthood. Specifically, the hard-earned lesson of expectations versus reality. Though some of us are blessed with Teslas at 17, most teenagers receive a car that’s been … let’s say previously loved. And that’s probably a good thing, considering nearly half of first-year drivers end up in wrecks. Might as well get the dings on the lemon, right?

Of course, wrecks aside, buying a used car might end up costing more in the long run after needing repairs, breaking down and just a general slew of unexpected surprises. But hey, at least we can all look back and laugh.

My first car, for example, was a hand-me-down Toyota of some sort from my mother. I don’t recall the specific model, but I definitely remember getting into a fender bender within the first week of having it. She had forgotten to get the brakes fixed … isn’t that a fun story?

Jimmy Fallon recently asked his “Tonight Show” audience on Twitter to share their own worst car experiences. Some of them make my brake fiasco look like cakewalk (or cakedrive, in this case). Either way, these responses might make us all feel a little less alone. Or at the very least, give us a chuckle.

Here are 22 responses with the most horsepower:

Keep Reading Show less
Joy

Teacher goes viral for her wholesome 'Chinese Dumpling Song'

Katie Norregaard has found her calling—teaching big lessons in little songs.

As educational as it is adorable.

On her TikTok profile, Katie Norregaard (aka Miss Katie) describes her brand as “if Mr. Rogers and AOC had a kid.” And it’s 100% accurate. The teaching artist has been going viral lately for her kid-friendly tunes that encourage kids to learn about other cultures, speak up for their values and be the best humans they can be.


@misskatiesings Reply to @typebteacher the internet gave me this brand one year ago and I haven’t looked back 🎶 ❤️ #fyp #misterrogers #preschool #aoc #teachertok ♬ She Share Story (for Vlog) - 山口夕依


Let’s face it, some kid’s songs are a tad abrasive with their cutesiness, to put it politely. A certain ditty about a shark pup comes to mind. Norregaard manages to bypass any empty saccharine-ness while still remaining incredibly sweet. The effortless warmth of her voice certainly helps with that. Again, she’s got that Mister Rogers vibe down to a tee.

“Miss Katie” has a treasure trove full of fun creations, such as her jazz version of “The Itsy Bitsy Spider,” but it’s her “Chinese Dumpling Song" that’s completely taking over the internet.
Keep Reading Show less

TikTok about '80s childhood is a total Gen X flashback.

As a Gen X parent, it's weird to try to describe my childhood to my kids. We're the generation that didn't grow up with the internet or cell phones, yet are raising kids who have never known a world without them. That difference alone is enough to make our 1980s childhoods feel like a completely different planet, but there are other differences too that often get overlooked.

How do you explain the transition from the brown and orange aesthetic of the '70s to the dusty rose and forest green carpeting of the '80s if you didn't experience it? When I tell my kids there were smoking sections in restaurants and airplanes and ashtrays everywhere, they look horrified (and rightfully so—what were we thinking?!). The fact that we went places with our friends with no quick way to get ahold of our parents? Unbelievable.

One day I described the process of listening to the radio, waiting for my favorite song to come on so I could record it on my tape recorder, and how mad I would get when the deejay talked through the intro of the song until the lyrics started. My Spotify-spoiled kids didn't even understand half of the words I said.

And '80s hair? With the feathered bangs and the terrible perms and the crunchy hair spray? What, why and how?

Keep Reading Show less