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anthony perry, third rail chicago, chicago transport authority

Chicago's red line train.

What makes somebody a hero these days? The term gets thrown around a lot. But usually it refers to someone who puts themselves at risk to selflessly assist another person, help a vulnerable animal or speak out when others stay silent. Heroes aren't born, they are made. And in a story first reported by a Bay Area ABC News affiliate, we get to see some incredible heroism caught on camera.

Things started when a fight broke out between two men at the 69th Street Red Line station in Chicago on Sunday and it spilled over to the tracks as a train came through, narrowly missing them, according to ABC. One man was electrocuted by the third rail that powers the train and was unconscious and convulsing on the tracks when the other scampered away. While a group of onlookers on the platform watched the unconscious man as he writhed on the tracks, 20-year-old Anthony Perry jumped down and lifted his body off the third rail to safety.

Perry then administered CPR with the help of a bystander. "It was definitely surreal," witness Tavi Ghee said according to ABC. "That was an out-of-body experience."

"There was a lady, I guess she had medical experience. She was talking me through on what to do. I feel like that was an angel from God. I ended up doing chest compressions and turning him on his side until the fire department got there," Perry said according to FOX 32.

Ghee took video of the amazing rescue.

Warning: The following video is graphic.


Perry’s heroics were incredible because he risked his life by approaching the third rail. “Customers who enter CTA tracks, known as the rail right of way, face not only the danger of oncoming trains, but also that of the third rail, which carries 600 volts of electricity used to propel trains—a level of electricity that is almost always lethal,” the Chicago Transportation Authority's website warns.

The man who was electrocuted suffered a burn to his left leg and an abrasion to the mouth but was transported to the hospital in good condition. The man who he fought with has yet to be caught, but the Chicago police are looking for him.

Perry briefly touched the rail and had minor burns.

"I was hoping I could just grab him and not feel nothing, but I felt a little shock," Perry said. "I felt it all through my body actually. I didn't let that stop me,” Perry said according to ABC.

“When I looked back on the video and I listen, it sounded like everyone was in fear … no one actually did anything, they just wanted to record,” Perry said according to the Chicago Sun-Times.

Perry was honored for his bravery on Tuesday with a ceremony with Chicago philanthropist Early Walker. Walker gave Perry a gas card for his bravery, knowing that he didn’t have a car.

But then a tow truck pulled up with a larger gift, an Audi A6.

The gift must have been a godsend for Perry, who has a 90-minute commute to work each day that requires him to take two buses and a train.

"We just wanted to honor you. We wanted to literally show our appreciation because we need more people like you. We need more Anthonys in the world. Everybody is about the views, about going viral but no one helps,” Walker said. “We just wanted to honor you, we want more Anthonys in the world.”

"Good does win," Perry said. "Good always wins!"

Marlon Brando and Sacheen Littlefeather.

Nearly 50 years after Sacheen Littlefeather endured boos and abusive jokes at the Academy Awards, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is issuing a formal apology. In 1973, Littlefeather refused Marlon Brando's Best Actor Oscar on his behalf for his iconic role in “The Godfather” at the ceremony to protest the film industry’s treatment of Native Americans.

She explained that Brando "very regretfully cannot accept this very generous award, the reasons for this being … the treatment of American Indians today by the film industry and on television in movie reruns, and also with recent happenings at Wounded Knee."

Littlefeather is a Native American civil rights activist who was born to a Native American (Apache and Yaqui) father and a European American mother.

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via Pixabay

A father cradling his infant son.

It's almost impossible to be handed a baby and not immediately break into baby talk. In fact, it seems incredibly strange to even consider talking to a baby like one would an adult. Studies have shown that babies prefer baby talk, too.

Researchers from Stanford found that babies prefer to be spoken to in baby talk or “parentese” as scientists refer to the sing-songy cooing we do when talking to infants.

“Often parents are discouraged from using baby talk by well-meaning friends or even health professionals,” Michael Frank, a Stanford psychologist, told Stanford News. “But the evidence suggests that it’s actually a great way to engage with your baby because babies just like it–it tells them, ‘This speech is meant for you!’”

The big question that has eluded scientists is whether parentese is a universal language or varies by culture.

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Brandon Conway sounds remarkably like Michael Jackson when he sings.

When Michael Jackson died 13 years ago, the pop music world lost a legend. However markedly mysterious and controversial his personal life was, his contributions to music will go down in history as some of the most influential of all time.

Part of what made him such a beloved singer was the uniqueness of his voice. From the time he was a young child singing lead for The Jackson 5, his high-pitched vocals stood out. Hearing him sing live was impressive, his pitch-perfect performances always entertaining.

No one could ever really be compared to MJ, or so we thought. Out of the blue, a guy showed up on TikTok recently with a casual performance that sounds so much like the King of Pop it's blowing people away.

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