+
anthony perry, third rail chicago, chicago transport authority

Chicago's red line train.

What makes somebody a hero these days? The term gets thrown around a lot. But usually it refers to someone who puts themselves at risk to selflessly assist another person, help a vulnerable animal or speak out when others stay silent. Heroes aren't born, they are made. And in a story first reported by a Bay Area ABC News affiliate, we get to see some incredible heroism caught on camera.

Things started when a fight broke out between two men at the 69th Street Red Line station in Chicago on Sunday and it spilled over to the tracks as a train came through, narrowly missing them, according to ABC. One man was electrocuted by the third rail that powers the train and was unconscious and convulsing on the tracks when the other scampered away. While a group of onlookers on the platform watched the unconscious man as he writhed on the tracks, 20-year-old Anthony Perry jumped down and lifted his body off the third rail to safety.

Perry then administered CPR with the help of a bystander. "It was definitely surreal," witness Tavi Ghee said according to ABC. "That was an out-of-body experience."

"There was a lady, I guess she had medical experience. She was talking me through on what to do. I feel like that was an angel from God. I ended up doing chest compressions and turning him on his side until the fire department got there," Perry said according to FOX 32.

Ghee took video of the amazing rescue.

Warning: The following video is graphic.


Perry’s heroics were incredible because he risked his life by approaching the third rail. “Customers who enter CTA tracks, known as the rail right of way, face not only the danger of oncoming trains, but also that of the third rail, which carries 600 volts of electricity used to propel trains—a level of electricity that is almost always lethal,” the Chicago Transportation Authority's website warns.

The man who was electrocuted suffered a burn to his left leg and an abrasion to the mouth but was transported to the hospital in good condition. The man who he fought with has yet to be caught, but the Chicago police are looking for him.

Perry briefly touched the rail and had minor burns.

"I was hoping I could just grab him and not feel nothing, but I felt a little shock," Perry said. "I felt it all through my body actually. I didn't let that stop me,” Perry said according to ABC.

“When I looked back on the video and I listen, it sounded like everyone was in fear … no one actually did anything, they just wanted to record,” Perry said according to the Chicago Sun-Times.

Perry was honored for his bravery on Tuesday with a ceremony with Chicago philanthropist Early Walker. Walker gave Perry a gas card for his bravery, knowing that he didn’t have a car.

But then a tow truck pulled up with a larger gift, an Audi A6.

The gift must have been a godsend for Perry, who has a 90-minute commute to work each day that requires him to take two buses and a train.

"We just wanted to honor you. We wanted to literally show our appreciation because we need more people like you. We need more Anthonys in the world. Everybody is about the views, about going viral but no one helps,” Walker said. “We just wanted to honor you, we want more Anthonys in the world.”

"Good does win," Perry said. "Good always wins!"

Photo by Stormseeker on Unsplash

Some cries for help can be hard to discern.

“I’m fine.”

How easily these two words slip from our mouths, often when nothing could be further from the truth. Sometimes, it feels safer to hide our true feelings, lest someone make a judgment or have a negative reaction. Other times, it’s a social rule instilled in childhood, perhaps even through punishment. Or maybe denying is the only way to combat overwhelm—if we ignore it all long enough, things will eventually get better anyway.

At the end of the day … it’s all about avoiding further pain, isn’t it?

But this denial can lead to even more suffering—not only emotionally, but physically as well. Everything from stiff muscles, to migraines, to digestive issues can stem from suppressing emotions.

Keep ReadingShow less
Pop Culture

Little girl sings Selena's ‘Como La Flor’ and wows the late singer's widower

'It's good to see someone like her, who will be the next Selena in so many ways.'

Little girl sings Selena's "Como La Flor."

Selena Quintanilla Pérez is so well-known that she's best recognized simply as "Selena," the same way people refer to Madonna.

Nearly 30 years after her untimely death, parents are passing the music of Selena onto their children and creating a new generation of fans. And in the age of social media, that means the new waves of fans are creating videos singing the icon's hits. In a video clip uploaded to Instagram and TikTok, 10-year-old Mariapaula Mazon gets up on stage to belt out "Como La Flor."

Keep ReadingShow less

This dad exemplifies stellar parenting.

As a parent, it's not always easy to know how to help your kids learn from life experiences. Some lessons they learn naturally and others they learn through parental guidance, but discerning which is which and how those things overlap can be challenging.

Kids don't come with instruction manuals, of course, but sometimes we see examples of great parenting we can point to and say, "AHA! That's how it's done."

One such example comes from a dad named Robert. He's been teaching his 5-year-old daughter Aubrin to skateboard and set up a mini half pipe for her to learn on. In a video on Instagram, Robert shared his interchanges with Aubrin after she crashed hard on the ramp during a lesson.

Keep ReadingShow less