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Depressed people often get bad advice. This satirical comic calls it out.

Sometimes it's just a matter of sorting out your feelings.

Depressed people often get bad advice. This satirical comic calls it out.

There isn't one cure-all for depression.

It's a difficult mental disorder that affects over 15 million people in the U.S., and there's no manual on navigating or beating it because it affects everyone differently.

But there are some things we can all relate to, especially if we've experienced depression ourselves. Visual "guides" to dealing with depression and understanding our emotions are all too common. But sometimes that advice can be a little bit ... dull and unhelpful.


That's why the artist in charge of Owl Turd Comix decided to call out some of his favorite depression advice mishaps.

These "cleaning" comics showcase the weird advice depressed people often get — advice that can be pretty much the opposite of what science says we should do with our emotions if we want to move forward. The comics poke fun of just how unhelpful this kind of advice can be.

Check them out below:

1. How easy would it be to just take a cloth to all those negative thoughts swimming around in your brain and wipe them away? Yeah, if only...

All illustrations by Shen/Owl Turd Comix, featured with permission.

I'm sure we all wish we could just consciously ignore the negative thoughts in our minds, replacing them with positive ones. But unfortunately, that usually doesn't work. The emotions are there, and they're there to stay. And they can actually help us sometimes.

Instead of ignoring tough emotions, endurance coach Christopher Bergland suggests practicing mindfulness by simply acknowledging that you're having thoughts that are unpleasant and then gently redirecting your brain, so you can move forward.

2. Storing up your anger? Again, that's a no.

Shelving your anger seems like it might help things. But research from places like the Mayo Clinic shows that holding grudges (and not processing your anger) can be detrimental to your mental health. Instead, if you can work to forgive someone who made you angry, that can be one of the best types of learning experiences.

These tips on anger management also suggest doing things like taking a time out instead to regroup your thoughts (yeah, it's not just for kids). You can even go take a run to calm down or come up with some possible solutions to what's making you mad.

3. Envy and regret be gone? Not so fast.

OK, maybe you can't physically grab all the envy and regret that lives inside you and throw it all away in a trash can. But it's an awesome metaphor, and this idea isn't so far off.

So what can we do if we're having these feelings of jealousy? We may not be able to simply toss them away, but we can acknowledge that we're having these emotions, then watch them pass like waves. When we become aware that they are harmful feelings, we can choose to redirect our thoughts to more positive ones.

4. Hide from your weird emotions? Again, no thanks.

Nope. Nope. Nope. As Owl Turd illustrates, this kind of advice is totally unhelpful. Running away from our emotions can feel empowering, but can hurt us in the long run. When you're choosing to ignore your feelings or run from your problems, you're essentially running from yourself. Plus, it can make us feel guilty when those feelings come sneaking back in.

Instead, most research suggests coming face-to-face with these perplexing feelings we can't make sense of and saying, "What's Up?" to find out what they want from us.

5. This is the most hilarious, albeit terrifying, metaphor ever.

Yeah, this illustration alone should be incentive enough for us to handle our emotions instead of throwing them somewhere where they're guaranteed to stare, haunt, and creep on us until we're forced to do something about them.

Don't let it get to that point.

It's important to remember that what works for one person may not necessarily work for the next person.

That's why Owl Turd's comics aren't a how-to guide to heal yourself of the mental disorder; they're a satirical commentary on the fact that people often suggest one-size-fits-all solutions that don't work.

The best way forward? According to research, it's all about practicing compassion, patience, and lots of self-love. Because you (and you, and you, and you) are worth it.

When "bobcat" trended on Twitter this week, no one anticipated the unreal series of events they were about to witness. The bizarre bobcat encounter was captured on a security cam video and...well...you just have to see it. (Read the following description if you want to be prepared, or skip down to the video if you want to be surprised. I promise, it's a wild ride either way.)

In a North Carolina neighborhood that looks like a present-day Pleasantville, a man carries a cup of coffee and a plate of brownies out to his car. "Good mornin!" he calls cheerfully to a neighbor jogging by. As he sets his coffee cup on the hood of the car, he says, "I need to wash my car." Well, shucks. His wife enters the camera frame on the other side of the car.

So far, it's just about the most classic modern Americana scene imaginable. And then...

A horrifying "rrrrawwwww!" Blood-curdling screaming. Running. Panic. The man abandons the brownies, races to his wife's side of the car, then emerges with an animal in his hands. He holds the creature up like Rafiki holding up Simba, then yells in its face, "Oh my god! It's a bobcat! Oh my god!"

Then he hucks the bobcat across the yard with all his might.

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Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
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Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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