Dan Rather had some important advice for taking care of yourself.

Dan Rather is a master of dropping truth bombs.

The 86-year-old news legend has been doling out important advice on how to deal with the current state of our world on social media. He had the perfect response to Trump supporters' cries for "civility" and gave the public hope when Justice Kennedy's retirement announcement felt like it might send the U.S. government into an even bigger tailspin.

"Take a deep breath and feel the cool air of hope and justice in your lungs, and then march forward," he wrote at the time.


In his latest post, Rather dropped yet another important piece of advice: Take in the moment. Live in the now.

One of my favorite things long has been taking a leisurely stroll with wife Jean at twilight time. My steps are getting...

Posted by Dan Rather on Tuesday, July 10, 2018

"One of my favorite things long has been taking a leisurely stroll with wife Jean at twilight time," Rather wrote on Facebook. "My steps are getting slower and, increasingly, I have another journey on my mind — the one into eternity."

Even when there's so much going on, Rather reminded us, stopping and taking a moment to breathe is essential: "But with it all, the joy — the sheer, unadulterated joy — of a hand-in-hand, slow walk as evening shadows fall never ceases. The contrast with the ever-present fast pace and screaming headlines of modern life is stark."

If you're feeling burnt out, Rather's got a "gentle recommendation" for you, too.

There's no way to completely disconnect from the news — here's why you shouldn't do it — but at a time when it feels somehow immoral not to be glued to every headline, Rather said most of us would do well to turn off our notifications and just meander for a while.

"I gently recommend it," he wrote. "Just walk slowly in the time after the sun sets and before night descends. Feel the breeze, smell the flowers, hear the trees leaves rustle and the birds sing. Watch as the stars begin to emerge."

And let this give you hope:

"If you must think any about the current state of the country and politics, remember: The outrageousness and dangers of Trump's Time may last for a while, but Twilight Time will last forever … on into eternity."

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