Dan Rather is a master of dropping truth bombs.

The 86-year-old news legend has been doling out important advice on how to deal with the current state of our world on social media. He had the perfect response to Trump supporters' cries for "civility" and gave the public hope when Justice Kennedy's retirement announcement felt like it might send the U.S. government into an even bigger tailspin.

"Take a deep breath and feel the cool air of hope and justice in your lungs, and then march forward," he wrote at the time.


In his latest post, Rather dropped yet another important piece of advice: Take in the moment. Live in the now.

One of my favorite things long has been taking a leisurely stroll with wife Jean at twilight time. My steps are getting...

Posted by

Dan Rather on Tuesday, July 10, 2018

"One of my favorite things long has been taking a leisurely stroll with wife Jean at twilight time," Rather wrote on Facebook. "My steps are getting slower and, increasingly, I have another journey on my mind — the one into eternity."

Even when there's so much going on, Rather reminded us, stopping and taking a moment to breathe is essential: "But with it all, the joy — the sheer, unadulterated joy — of a hand-in-hand, slow walk as evening shadows fall never ceases. The contrast with the ever-present fast pace and screaming headlines of modern life is stark."

If you're feeling burnt out, Rather's got a "gentle recommendation" for you, too.

There's no way to completely disconnect from the news — here's why you shouldn't do it — but at a time when it feels somehow immoral not to be glued to every headline, Rather said most of us would do well to turn off our notifications and just meander for a while.

"I gently recommend it," he wrote. "Just walk slowly in the time after the sun sets and before night descends. Feel the breeze, smell the flowers, hear the trees leaves rustle and the birds sing. Watch as the stars begin to emerge."

And let this give you hope:

"If you must think any about the current state of the country and politics, remember: The outrageousness and dangers of Trump's Time may last for a while, but Twilight Time will last forever … on into eternity."

Wear your values with products from PSA Supply Co., an independent site owned by our parent company, GOOD Worldwide Inc. GOOD makes money when you buy these products, and 10% of profits go to The Center for Community Change Action. Use discount code UPWORTHY to get 15% off your first order!
True

It takes a special type of person to become a nurse. The job requires a combination of energy, empathy, clear mind, oftentimes a strong stomach, and a cheerful attitude. And while people typically think of nursing in a clinical setting, some nurses are driven to work with the people that feel forgotten by society.

Keep Reading Show less

Prior to baby formula, breastfeeding was the norm, but that doesn't mean it always worked.

As if the past handful of years weren't challenging enough, the U.S. is currently dealing with a baby formula crisis.

Due to a perfect storm of supply chain issues, product recalls, labor shortages and inflation, manufacturers are struggling to keep up with formula demand and retailers are rationing supplies. As a result, families that rely on formula are scrambling to ensure that their babies get the food they need.

Naturally, people are weighing in on the crisis, with some throwing out simplistic advice like, "Why don't you just do what people did before baby formula was invented and just breastfeed?"

That might seem logical, unless you understand how breastfeeding works and know a bit about infant mortality throughout human history.

Keep Reading Show less

Courtesy of Elaine Ahn

True

The energy in a hospital can sometimes feel overwhelming, whether you’re experiencing it as a patient, visitor or employee. However, there are a few one-of-a-kind individuals like Elaine Ahn, an operating room registered nurse in Diamond Bar, California, who thrive under this type of constant pressure.

Keep Reading Show less
via Pexels

Your cat knows you better than you think.

Cats are often seen as being aloof or standoffish, even with their owners. Of course, that differs based on who that cat lives with and their lifetime of experience with humans. But when compared to man’s best friend, cats usually seem less interested in those around them, regardless of species.

However, a new study out of Japan has found that cats may be paying more attention to their fellow felines and human friends than most people thought. In fact, they could be listening to human conversations.

"What we discovered is astonishing," Saho Takagi, a research fellow specializing in animal science at Azabu University in Kanagawa Prefecture, told The Asahi Shimbun. "I want people to know the truth. Felines do not appear to listen to people's conversations, but as a matter of fact, they do."

How do we know they’re listening? Because the study shows that household cats often know the names of their human and feline friends.

Keep Reading Show less

Emily Calandrelli was stopped by TSA agents when she tried to bring her ice packs for pumped milk through airport security.

Traveling without your baby for the first time can be tough. And if you're breastfeeding, it can be even tougher, as you have to pump milk every few hours to keep your body producing enough, to avoid an enormous amount of discomfort and to prevent risk of infection.

But for Emily Calandrelli, taking a recent work trip away from her 10-week-old son was far more challenging than it needed to be.

Calandrelli is a mom of two, an aerospace engineer and the host of the Netflix kids' science show "Emily's Wonder Lab." She was recently taking her first work trip since welcoming her second child, which included a five-hour flight from Los Angeles to Washington, D.C. Calandrelli is breastfeeding her son and had planned to pump just before boarding the plane. She brought ice packs to keep the milk from spoiling during the flight, but when she tried to go through airport security, the TSA agents refused to let her take some of her supplies.

Keep Reading Show less