Boaty McBoatface dove to the bottom of the ocean. What it found was 'unprecedented.'

All hail Boaty McBoatface, lord of the seas!

Boaty McBoatface is pulled out of the water. Photo by National Environment Research Council.

The internet-famous submarine just completed its maiden voyage, coming back with reams of "unprecedented data" about the Southern Ocean around Antarctica, according to the researchers who sailed with it.


"Boaty is already delivering new insight into some of the coldest ocean waters on Earth, giving scientists a greater understanding of changes in the Antarctic region and shaping a global effort to tackle climate change," U.K. science minister Jo Johnson said in a statement.

In 2016, the U.K.'s Natural Environmental Research Council held an online contest to name a new polar research vessel.

Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images.

While the council put forth several suggestions, "Boaty McBoatface," suggested by former BBC radio host James Hand, was the runaway winner.

The council ultimately rejected the results, christening the vessel the RRS Sir David Attenborough instead.

Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images.

As a consolation prize, they elected to bestow the name on a small yellow submersible carried on board.

Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images.

That small yellow submersible just finished beasting around some of the deepest, coldest waters around Antarctica.  

Its mission involved mapping the region's ocean currents as well as studying their speed, temperature, and salinity.

Some scientists worry that rising temperatures and increased freshwater could be altering the global circulation of ocean water, resulting in even more rapid and drastic climate change.

The information gathered by Boaty on the flows in the Orkney Passage off the southern continent hasn't been analyzed yet, but it is the first of its kind, according to the researchers on the project.

If it takes a tiny underwater robot with a ridiculous name to make the people of Earth get serious about the threat to the planet's ocean currents, then so be it.

The scientists hope to learn more about the currents in the coming years, with Boaty giving them the opportunity to study the system far beyond their previous capabilities.

Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images.

"Up until now we have only been able to take measurements from a fixed point, but now, we are able to obtain a much more detailed picture of what is happening in this very important underwater landscape," University of Southampton professor Alberto Naveira Garabato, the study's leader, said in a statement. "The challenge for us now is to analyse it all."

Future Boaty missions to the area are already in the works, which is hopeful news for the planet.

Sail on, Boaty McBoatface, you noble vessel!

May you always receive Poseidon's favor!

Image by 5540867 from Pixabay

Figuring out what to do for a mom on Mother's Day can be a tricky thing. There's the standard flowers or candy, of course, and taking her out to a nice brunch is a fairly universal winner. But what do moms really want?

Speaking from experience—my kids range from age 12 to 20—a lot depends on the stage of motherhood. What I wanted when my kids were little is different than what I want now, and I'm sure when my kids are grown and gone I'll want something different again.

We asked our readers to share what they want for Mother's Day, and while the answers were varied, there were some common themes that emerged.

Moms of young kids want a break.

When your kids are little, motherhood is relentless. Precious and adorable, yes. Wonderful and rewarding, absolutely. But it's a LOT. And it's a lot all the fricking time.

Most moms I know would love the gift of alone time, either away at a hotel or Airbnb or in their own home with no one else around. Time alone is a priceless commodity at this stage, especially if it comes with someone else taking care of cleaning, making sure the kids are fed and safe and occupied, doing the laundry, etc.

This is especially true after more than a year of pandemic living, where we moms have spent more time than usual at home with our offspring. While in some ways that's been great, again, it's a lot.

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Courtesy of CeraVe
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"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

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