Boaty McBoatface dove to the bottom of the ocean. What it found was 'unprecedented.'

All hail Boaty McBoatface, lord of the seas!

Boaty McBoatface is pulled out of the water. Photo by National Environment Research Council.

The internet-famous submarine just completed its maiden voyage, coming back with reams of "unprecedented data" about the Southern Ocean around Antarctica, according to the researchers who sailed with it.


"Boaty is already delivering new insight into some of the coldest ocean waters on Earth, giving scientists a greater understanding of changes in the Antarctic region and shaping a global effort to tackle climate change," U.K. science minister Jo Johnson said in a statement.

In 2016, the U.K.'s Natural Environmental Research Council held an online contest to name a new polar research vessel.

Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images.

While the council put forth several suggestions, "Boaty McBoatface," suggested by former BBC radio host James Hand, was the runaway winner.

The council ultimately rejected the results, christening the vessel the RRS Sir David Attenborough instead.

Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images.

As a consolation prize, they elected to bestow the name on a small yellow submersible carried on board.

Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images.

That small yellow submersible just finished beasting around some of the deepest, coldest waters around Antarctica.  

Its mission involved mapping the region's ocean currents as well as studying their speed, temperature, and salinity.

Some scientists worry that rising temperatures and increased freshwater could be altering the global circulation of ocean water, resulting in even more rapid and drastic climate change.

The information gathered by Boaty on the flows in the Orkney Passage off the southern continent hasn't been analyzed yet, but it is the first of its kind, according to the researchers on the project.

If it takes a tiny underwater robot with a ridiculous name to make the people of Earth get serious about the threat to the planet's ocean currents, then so be it.

The scientists hope to learn more about the currents in the coming years, with Boaty giving them the opportunity to study the system far beyond their previous capabilities.

Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images.

"Up until now we have only been able to take measurements from a fixed point, but now, we are able to obtain a much more detailed picture of what is happening in this very important underwater landscape," University of Southampton professor Alberto Naveira Garabato, the study's leader, said in a statement. "The challenge for us now is to analyse it all."

Future Boaty missions to the area are already in the works, which is hopeful news for the planet.

Sail on, Boaty McBoatface, you noble vessel!

May you always receive Poseidon's favor!

via USO

Army Capt. Justin Meredith used the Bob Hope Legacy Reading Program to read to his son and family while deployed in the Middle East.

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One of the biggest challenges deployed service members face is the feeling of being separated from their families, especially when they have children. It's also very stressful for children to be away from parents who are deployed for long periods of time.

For the past four years, the USO has brought deployed service members and their families closer through a wonderful program that allows them to read together. The Bob Hope Legacy Reading Program gives deployed service members the ability to choose a book, read it on camera, then send both the recording and book to their child.

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Jimmy Fallon #MyFamilyIsWeird.

It’s that time of year again, the holiday season is when we get the pleasure of spending way more time than we’re used to with our families. For those of us who’ve moved away from our immediate families, the holidays are a great time to reacquaint ourselves with old traditions and to realize that some of them may be a little strange.

Every family seems to have its own brand of weirdness. In fact, I wouldn’t trust anyone who says that their family is completely normal.

On November 18, “The Tonight Show” host Jimmy Fallon gave everyone a reason to celebrate their unique families by asking them to share their favorite stories under #MyFamilyIsWeird. The responses were everything from odd holiday traditions to family members that may have a screw (or two!) loose.

Here are 17 of the funniest responses.

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Representative Nancy Mace on Fox News and CNN

Rep. Nancy Mace (R-SC) is the subject of an embarrassing viral video where she downplays the importance of the COVID-19 vaccine on Fox News and then, an hour later, touts their importance on CNN.

On Fox’s “Sunday Morning Futures,” Mace made some misleading and dangerous statements about why “natural immunity” is better than immunity provided by vaccines.

“One thing the CDC and no policy maker at the federal level has done so far is take into account what natural immunity has done,” Mace said. “That may be what we’re seeing in Florida today. In some studies that I have read, natural immunity gives you 27 times more protection against future COVID infection than vaccination. We need to take all of the science into account and not selectively choosing what science to follow when we are making policy decisions.”

This may sound scientific, but Mace leaves out the part where to get “natural immunity,” you have to survive the virus first. The goal, for most people during a pandemic, is not to get sick in the first place.

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Cayce LaCorte explains why virginity doesn't exist.

The concept of virginity is a very loaded issue in American culture. If a woman loses hers when she's too young she can be slut-shamed. If a man remains a virgin for too long, he can be bullied for not being manly enough.

There is also a whole slew of religious mind games associated with virginity that can give people some serious psychological problems associated with sex.

Losing one's virginity has also been blown up way beyond proportion. It's often believed that it's a magical experience—it's usually not. Or that after having sex for the first time people can really start to enjoy living life—not the case.

What if we just dropped all of the stigmas surrounding virginity and instead, replaced them with healthy attitudes toward sex and relationships?

Writer Cayce LaCorte is going viral on TikTok for the simple way she's taught her five daughters to think about virginity. They don't have to. LaCorte shared her parenting ideas on TikTok in response to mom-influencer Nevada Shareef's question: "Name something about the way you raised your kids that people think is weird but you think is healthy."

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