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Wisconsin is a ridiculously fun state, known for things like:

Image from Dear Clara on Tumblr.


and...

Image from MakeMeSocial.

Unfortunately, they're also known for this kind of behavior:

GIF from "Will & Grace."

But no, really. It can get a little out of hand.

Based on information found at FlowingData.com.

Marquette County outmatched the rest of Wisconsin in binge-drinking rates.

Back in 2005, they had a higher rate of bingedrinking than many other counties in Wisconsin — they were at 28%. The average for the state was 25%.

In addition to binge drinking being seriously dangerous, it also costs Wisconsin big time.

Based on research in this University of Wisconsin study.

That's equal to about $1,200 extra per taxpayer, per year when you combine taxes, health care costs, and other losses.

Marquette County made that figure plummet faster than a Wisconsin winter windchill.

By 2012, instead of going up by 5% like the rest of Wisconsin did, Marquette county reduced theirs by 15%.

Chart created by Nancy Fullman and Ellen Squires of Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation. Used with permission from Solutions Journalism.

So what ARE they doing differently than other counties?

It's hard to point to any one thing as the definitive measure that turned things around, but some think one specific program had a lot to do with it.

Marquette County launched a Healthy Communities Healthy Youth initiative in 2003.

Yes, 2003. But public health programs often take time to be fully implemented and then see results, so it is reasonable to think that with increased focus, it actually did have significant impact during the period monitored. Here are just a few key points of it:

  • Bartender training programs to prevent over-serving patrons
  • Testing the compliance of outlets that potentially sell alcohol to minors
  • Marketing aimed at changing binge-drinking culture
  • Reaching future drinkers before they begin binge-drinking behavior, via their parents

The program serves as a great resource for young people, parents, and anyone who serves alcohol, providing concrete guidance (in the form of training, investment, and helpful tips) to encourage responsible behavior.

For instance, the Healthy Communities Healthy Youth site offers parents ideas for how to text with their teens when those teens have gone to a party.

The suggested texts are organized by how early or late in the evening it is.

"Early evening:

I trust you to make good decisions 2nite.

Late evening:

Be careful coming home. I know you made good decisions, but be cautious of others who aren't as smart as you!"





Here's another example of their advice in action:

The program is a great example of how strong proposals that encourage responsible, supported decision making can make a real, tangible difference to a culture AND an economy.

Marquette County isn't yet satisfied with this initial 15% drop though.

They have plans to launch additional efforts and keep chipping away at those binge-drinking numbers. Because it's way more fun to "Drink Wisconsibly" and NOT pay $1,200 a year extra, amirite?

Image used with permission by ShopWisconsibly.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

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Canva

Small actions lead to big movements.

Acts of kindness—we know they’re important not only for others, but for ourselves. They can contribute to a more positive community and help us feel more connected, happier even. But in our incessantly busy and hectic lives, performing good deeds can feel like an unattainable goal. Or perhaps we equate generosity with monetary contribution, which can feel like an impossible task depending on a person’s financial situation.

Perhaps surprisingly, the main reason people don’t offer more acts of kindness is the fear of being misunderstood. That is, at least, according to The Kindness Test—an online questionnaire about being nice to others that more than 60,000 people from 144 countries completed. It does make sense—having your good intentions be viewed as an awkward source of discomfort is not exactly fun for either party.

However, the results of The Kindness Test also indicated those fears were perhaps unfounded. The most common words people used were "happy," "grateful," "loved," "relieved" and "pleased" to describe their feelings after receiving kindness. Less than 1% of people said they felt embarrassed, according to the BBC.


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via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


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Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.


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