Amy Schumer is using her birthday to send a clear message about gun control.

June 1 is Amy Schumer's birthday.

In lieu of cards or well-wishes, however, the comedian is asking her fans for a more sobering gift: for each one of them to give a damn about America's gun violence crisis.

Photo by Mark Davis/Getty Images.


In an Instagram post shared with her nearly 7 million followers, Schumer encouraged everyone to wear orange on June 1.

"Hi! Tomorrow is my bday," the star, who turns 37 this year, began her caption. "If you want to say happy birthday to me please do it by joining me for #wearorangeday tomorrow as a sign to end gun violence. Everytown.org can help!"

Since two women were shot and killed at a Louisiana screening of her 2015 comedy, "Trainwreck," Schumer's been a vocal advocate for gun reform on the national stage.

"These shootings have got to stop," she said during a press conference calling for action alongside her cousin, New York Senator Chuck Schumer. "I don't know how else to say it."

Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images.

The Wear Orange Day Schumer's promoting — organized by Everytown for Gun Safety — has been turning tragedy into real change.

The day's historical significance dates back to 2013, when Chicago teen Hadiya Pendleton was shot and killed just days after having performed at President Barack Obama's second inaugural parade.

She was 15 years old.

Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images.

In the aftermath of her death, Pendleton's friends wore orange to honor her memory, and Everytown took part. Wear Orange grew from there, becoming a national day of remembrance for all victims of gun violence and a plea to change the status quo.

This year's Wear Orange Day, however, comes at an especially pivotal moment.

With the horrific shootings in Parkland, Florida, and Santa Fe, Texas, still fresh in many of our minds, Americans are especially hungry for smarter, sensical gun laws to help keep their communities safe.

With the November midterms six months away, Everytown believes that hunger can save lives.

"Our movement gains momentum when gun sense activists come together to fight for a future free from gun violence," Wear Orange's website reads. "Wear Orange Weekend is an opportunity for us to show the country just how powerful we are."

You can be part of the solution. Find a local Wear Orange event in your community.

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