A young girl narrates her story of being sold for sex and wondering why hotel workers did nothing.

She was pretty sure they could tell something wasn't right.

Sex trafficking is happening right under our noses.

"At least 20.9 million adults and children are bought and sold worldwide into commercial sexual servitude, forced labor and bonded labor." — Equality Now

Every year, approximately 2 million children are victims of sex trafficking. Some are kidnapped, some are runaways, some are even exploited by their own trusted caretakers.

And unfortunately, many of these horrific occurrences happen in hotels.


What if hotel workers could do more? The one described in this #DoesYourHotelKnow video might have.

Imagine the difference a hotel worker could have made in that girl's life. They — and even you as a guest — can decide to be vigilant.

Be aware of what to notice about people coming and going in a hotel who may be being exploited, like these flags from The Polaris Project:

  • Is fearful, anxious, depressed, submissive, tense, or nervous/paranoid
  • Appears malnourished
  • Shows signs of physical and/or sexual abuse, physical restraint, confinement, or torture
  • Has few or no personal possessions
  • Is not in control of their own identification documents (ID or passport)
  • Is not allowed to or able to speak for themselves (a third party may insist on being present and/or translating)
  • Claims of just visiting and inability to clarify where they are staying or give an address
  • Lack of knowledge of whereabouts or do not know what city they are in
  • Loss of sense of time
  • Has numerous inconsistencies in their story

Don't be afraid to make a call.

If you see these red flags, immediately call the National Human Trafficking Resource Center hotline at (888) 373-7888. Or text INFO or HELP to 233733 (BeFree).

You could make the entire difference in a victim being rescued and predators being apprehended. And sharing this can help others be ready to do the same.

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