A surprisingly touching PSA about organ donation starring the world's biggest a**hole.

This is Coleman Sweeney. He's an asshole — and the star of a new PSA from Donate Life, a nonprofit organization that raises awareness for organ donation.

Coleman Sweeney being an asshole. Image via Sarah Waitress/YouTube.

In the PSA, Sweeney more than earns his title as possibly "The World's Biggest Asshole" by doing things like stealing people's laundry, defiling the women's bathroom at a busy nightclub, and shooting paintballs at puppies.


But at the end of the PSA, he actually manages to redeem himself ... by dying.

You see, Sweeney was an organ donor. His liver, heart, tendons, and corneas ended up saving or improving the lives of four people, thus turning Coleman Sweeney, a certified asshole, into a hero — and this PSA about organ donation into an incredibly funny short that might actually save some lives.

Rest in peace, you heroic piece of sh**. Image via Sarah Waitress/YouTube.

Of course, even if you're not an asshole like Sweeney, becoming an organ donor is still a heroic thing to do.

According to Live On NY, over 120,000 people are waiting for life-saving organ donations, and one donor can save as many as eight lives. That same donor can also improve the lives of up to 50 individuals by donating tissue and eyes.

Plus, anyone over the age of 18 can register to become a donor, regardless of medical history. So there's pretty much no reason not to.

Even Coleman Sweeney, the world's biggest asshole, knew that becoming an organ donor is the right thing to do.

To register to become an organ donor, click here.

Watch the full Coleman Sweeney PSA:

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