A surprisingly touching PSA about organ donation starring the world's biggest a**hole.

This is Coleman Sweeney. He's an asshole — and the star of a new PSA from Donate Life, a nonprofit organization that raises awareness for organ donation.

Coleman Sweeney being an asshole. Image via Sarah Waitress/YouTube.

In the PSA, Sweeney more than earns his title as possibly "The World's Biggest Asshole" by doing things like stealing people's laundry, defiling the women's bathroom at a busy nightclub, and shooting paintballs at puppies.


But at the end of the PSA, he actually manages to redeem himself ... by dying.

You see, Sweeney was an organ donor. His liver, heart, tendons, and corneas ended up saving or improving the lives of four people, thus turning Coleman Sweeney, a certified asshole, into a hero — and this PSA about organ donation into an incredibly funny short that might actually save some lives.

Rest in peace, you heroic piece of sh**. Image via Sarah Waitress/YouTube.

Of course, even if you're not an asshole like Sweeney, becoming an organ donor is still a heroic thing to do.

According to Live On NY, over 120,000 people are waiting for life-saving organ donations, and one donor can save as many as eight lives. That same donor can also improve the lives of up to 50 individuals by donating tissue and eyes.

Plus, anyone over the age of 18 can register to become a donor, regardless of medical history. So there's pretty much no reason not to.

Even Coleman Sweeney, the world's biggest asshole, knew that becoming an organ donor is the right thing to do.

To register to become an organ donor, click here.

Watch the full Coleman Sweeney PSA:

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.