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When you ask kids vs. parents about the future, the difference is important.

If you believe the world is only getting worse, this one's for you.

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TOMS One for One

What does your future look like?

In the wake of recent tragedy, it's easy to feel hopeless. Sometimes, it seems as though the world is meant only for bad things to happen.

That's what it seemed when a couple of filmmakers asked a bunch of grown-ups what the future looked like to them.


All GIFs via "Ainda dá Tempo"/Vimeo.

But what does the future look like to kids?

When the filmmakers asked their kids a similar question — about what their future looks like — their visions were starkly different and full of possibility.

From creative passions...

...to making the world a better place...

...to just having a rad time.

The effect of their optimism on their parents? Inspiring!

Love the emphasis on good care. <3

Happy tears!

Heck yes you do — they are awesome!

Because really, our future is for them, isn't it?

These kids remind us why we need to make the world a better place. And there is still time!

Sometimes it just takes young voices to remind us where our priorities should be: to make the kind of globally connected and empathetic world that our kids deserve and demand.

So, what does our future really look like?

There's a lot of speculation, but there's also a lot of hope — and a lot of world leaders, organizations, celebrities, and everyday folks who are actually trying to make it happen.

You may have recently heard about the Global Goals. Back in September, nearly 200 world leaders committed to work on three broad goals that could truly make the world a better place: ending poverty, fighting inequality, and fixing climate change.

This December, the world is uniting again at COP21 in Paris to center its attention on that third goal of fixing our warming planet — a goal that actually is 100% achievable.

These may seem huge, but looking into the faces of what's at stake — this ambitious and energetic and wonderful next generation — can revitalize us to unify our voices and work together toward real change. It's happening!

Need a pick-me-up? Listen to their hopeful voices. :)

Feel the feels here:

Can you think of someone who needs this kind of encouragement? Pass it on. :)

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To support this effort and other programs like it, all you have to do is keep doing what you're doing — like shopping for laundry detergent. Turn your everyday actions into acts of good every day at P&G Good Everyday.

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HHS Photo Christopher Smith

Bill Gates, billionaire and founder of Microsoft, is pointing the finger at social media companies like Facebook and Twitter for spreading misinformation about the coronavirus.

In an interview with Fast Company, Gates said: "Can the social media companies be more helpful on these issues? What creativity do we have?" Sadly, the digital tools probably have been a net contributor to spreading what I consider to be crazy ideas."

According to Gates, crazy ideas aren't just limited to the internet. They are going beyond that. He doesn't see the logic behind not protecting yourself and others from coronavirus."Not wearing masks is hard to understand, because it is not that bothersome," he explained. "It is not expensive and yet some people feel it is a sign of freedom or something, despite risk of infecting people."


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