A reporter finally called out Trump's fake news claims in the White House today.

Brian Karem took a bold stand in the name of freedom of the press.

Things got heated during today's White House press briefing over a familiar topic: fake news.

After Breitbart's Charlie Spiering asked a question about CNN's decision to retract and apologize for a controversial story about connections between one of President Donald Trump's allies and Russia, Deputy Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders tore into media outlets for running what she called "fake news directed at this president."

The goal was clear: to sow distrust in reporting that made the administration look bad. It's been done time and time again.


White House reporter Brian Karem was tired of the unending assault and decided to speak up.

"Any one of us are replaceable, and any one of us, if we don’t get it right, the audience has the opportunity to turn the channel or not read us," said Karem, emphasizing journalists are just trying to do their jobs. They want to be able to ask questions, get answers, and report the truth.

By all accounts, CNN did the right thing about the story in question. They made a mistake and did what they could to fix it.

The story, which ran on CNN's website, alleged that Congress was investigating connections between Trump ally Anthony Scaramucci and a Russian investment fund. Shortly after the article was published, the outlet pulled it down, issuing a statement saying the story didn't live up to their editorial standards. Three journalists involved with the story resigned, and Scaramucci accepted CNN's apology. This is how things are supposed to work when a mistake is made.

Which is why Karem — who isn't involved with CNN, but was simply tired of reputable news outlets being called "fake news" — decided to speak up. And it's a good thing he did.

Making a mistake, owning up to it, and facing the consequences isn't "fake news." It's time Trump learns this lesson.

This morning, the president sent out a series of tweets calling CNN, NBC, CBS, ABC, The New York Times, and The Washington Post "fake news."

Fact check: They're not.

Interestingly enough, just a few hours later, Pulitzer-winning Washington Post reporter David Fahrenthold‏ wrote that Trump had some very literal "fake news" hanging up at a number of his own properties: a phony Time magazine cover. The irony here shouldn't be lost on anyone.

It might seem comical our president is so out of touch with reality that he and his administration declare anything he doesn't like to be "fake news," but it's not. It's dangerous.

"If the media can’t be trusted to report the news, that’s a dangerous place for America," said Huckabee Sanders during the briefing.

She's right. That's why more people like Karem must push back against an administration dead set on suppressing free speech. While he wasn't the one being called "fake news" today, there's no telling what tomorrow will bring.

Watch the entire, powerful exchange below:

Most Shared
Facebook / Amazinggracie.ga

A disabled dog with no front legs can now run and play thanks to a 12-year-old volunteer at an animal shelter who built her a wheelchair out of Legos.

One-year-old Gracie was dumped at a veterinary clinic when she was a baby. She was covered in maggots and was missing hair under her eyes and on her feet and tail. She was also missing her two front legs due to a birth defect.

The vet reached out to a local rescue called Mostly Mutts Animal Rescue, in Kennesaw, Georgia, who took Gracie in to help her find a new home. The Turley family, who runs the shelter, loved Gracie so much, they decided to adopt her for themselves.

Gracie loves to play with her fur siblings, including a dog who is paralyzed in his hind legs and likes to pull her around, and on who has three legs. While Gracie can get around OK on her own two hind legs, her mom, Tammy, was worried about her getting injured so they enlisted the help of Dylan, 12, a volunteer at the shelter.

RELATED: This adorable Twitter thread captures a woman's surprise reunion with her foster dog

Amazing Gracie Intro- 12 year old builds LEGO wheelchair for 2 legged puppy www.youtube.com

Keep Reading Show less
popular
Vaping 360

A young doctor has taken to TikTok, the new social media app popular among Gen. Z, to share information about important health issues, including the negative side effects of vaping.

Dr. Rose Marie Leslie, 29, is a second-year family resident at the University of Minnesota Physicians Broadway Family Medicine Clinic.

When she first joined the platform six months ago, she initially started sharing videos about her hectic life as a resident. But whenever she'd share videos with medical facts, she noticed more comments and likes.


Dr. Leslie on TikTok www.tiktok.com


Keep Reading Show less
popular
Wikipedia

Gina Rodriguez doesn't exactly have a great track record when it comes to talking about black representation. There was that time when she (incorrectly) said that Latina actresses are paid less than black actresses. Or that time when she interrupted an interviewer for saying her co-star, Yara Shahidi, was a role model to black women. Or that time when she tried to make "Black Panther" about her. Now, Rodriguez is under heat again, this time for rapping the n-word and being "sorry, not sorry" about it.

Rodriguez posted an Instagram story of herself singing along to "Read or Not" by the Fugees while getting her hair and make-up done. In the short video, she can be seen singing the lyrics, including the n-word, and laughing. Rodriguez deleted the video quickly, but not quick enough. Twitter was, to say the least, not pleased.

Keep Reading Show less
popular

There's nothing like a good reunion story to get you misty in the ol' tear ducts. Kate Howard, the managing editor of Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting, shared a story of randomly running into the dog she used to foster on Twitter. You know all those dog reunion movies? The ones with names like A Dog's Hope and A Dog's Sloppy Kiss? The ones that make you cry buckets no matter how hard you think your heart is? Well, this is that, but in real life.

Keep Reading Show less
popular