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A mom's heartbreaking letter to the doctor who never 'told her the truth' about her baby.

'[Our prenatal specialist] repeatedly suggested we abort. He said her and our quality of life would be horrible. He was so unbelievably wrong.'

A mom's heartbreaking letter to the doctor who never 'told her the truth' about her baby.

Courtney Williams Baker lives in Sanford, Florida, with her three daughters.

Courtney and her daughters. All photos used with permission.

Her youngest, Emersyn Faith, has Down syndrome.

Courtney said that before Emersyn was born, her doctor recommended that she abort the baby.


"[Our prenatal specialist] repeatedly suggested we abort," Baker said in a post. "He said her and our quality of life would be horrible. He was so unbelievably wrong."

So the mother of 15-month-old Emersyn penned a heartfelt and powerful note to that doctor.

She explained that her life has only improved since having Emersyn. She also shared the letter with the Parker Myles Facebook page in hopes it might offer strength to other parents going through similar situations:

This took so long to write because I understand how important it is. I wanted it to be perfect. Just like Emmy.Open...

Posted by Courtney Williams Baker on Wednesday, April 27, 2016

The full text of the letter reads:

"Dear Doctor,

A friend recently told me of when her prenatal specialist would see her child during her sonograms, he would comment, 'He’s perfect.' Once her son was born with Down syndrome, she visited that same doctor. He looked at her little boy and said, 'I told you. He’s perfect.'

Her story tore me apart. While I was so grateful for my friend’s experience, it filled me with such sorrow because of what I should have had. I wish you would have been that doctor.

I came to you during the most difficult time in my life. I was terrified, anxious and in complete despair. I didn’t know the truth yet about my baby, and that’s what I desperately needed from you. But instead of support and encouragement, you suggested we terminate our child. I told you her name, and you asked us again if we understood how low our quality of life would be with a child with Down syndrome. You suggested we reconsider our decision to continue the pregnancy.

From that first visit, we dreaded our appointments. The most difficult time in my life was made nearly unbearable because you never told me the truth.

My child was perfect.

I’m not angry. I’m not bitter. I’m really just sad. I’m sad the tiny beating hearts you see every day don’t fill you with a perpetual awe. I’m sad the intricate details and the miracle of those sweet little fingers and toes, lungs and eyes and ears don’t always give you pause. I’m sad you were so very wrong to say a baby with Down syndrome would decrease our quality of life. And I’m heartbroken you might have said that to a mommy even today. But I’m mostly sad you’ll never have the privilege of knowing my daughter, Emersyn.

Because, you see, Emersyn has not only added to our quality of life, she’s touched the hearts of thousands. She’s given us a purpose and a joy that is impossible to express. She’s given us bigger smiles, more laughter and sweeter kisses than we’ve ever known. She’s opened our eyes to true beauty and pure love.

So my prayer is that no other mommy will have to go through what I did. My prayer is that you, too, will now see true beauty and pure love with every sonogram. And my prayer is when you see that next baby with Down syndrome lovingly tucked in her mother’s womb, you will look at that mommy and see me then tell her the truth: 'Your child is absolutely perfect.'"















Baker told ABC it was incredibly therapeutic to send the letter.

"Every action, from opening and closing the mailbox to raising the red flag, was closure for me," Baker told ABC.

Emersyn shows off her new outfit. Photo by Courtney Baker, used with permission.

"I have no idea how the doctor might have reacted to my letter," Baker said, "but I do have faith that God can work any miracle, and he can change any heart."

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