A man who helped design an ingenious car feature reads a letter from a guy it saved.
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Ford

No one likes to imagine what would happen if they were in a serious car accident.

Chances are that most of us will get into some sort of collision at some point, whether minor or more serious. Estimates from the car insurance industry say collisions happen to most longtime drivers three to four times during their driving lifetimes.

Fortunately for us, there are people like David Hatton who have devoted their career to developing technology to provide drivers peace of mind.


David and his team at Ford have created a feature called SYNC 911 Assist® to change how car accidents are communicated to and handled by authorities — for good. 

With the 911 Assist® feature, you don't have to call 911 in the event of a collision. Instead, your car calls for you.

Imagine you're driving to meet an old high school friend for dinner. Another driver runs a red light and plows into you, and your airbags deploy. You are scared, disoriented, maybe even injured — and the only way to get help is to hope someone saw the accident and will call 911 or to find your phone and call for help yourself. 

With SYNC 911 Assist®, instead of having to find a phone to dial 911 for help, the information about your collision is instantly delivered through your car's Bluetooth system: where you're located, what part of your car was affected, even how many seat belts were in use. It'll connect you directly to a 911 operator — no effort on your end required.

If your Bluetooth® is turned off, SYNC can turn it on. If your "Do Not Disturb" setting is on and your phone is offline, it will look for any previously paired phone that was connected to the system. Ford engineers looked at scenarios that could go wrong and engineered SYNC 911 Assist® to make them go right.

SYNC 911 Assist® in action. All images via Ford, used with permission.

It's making a huge impact.

Since SYNC 911 Assist® launched, Hatton has been receiving letters from people thanking him for his work — letters such as this one, from a gentleman in Texas: 

"I live in rural, central Texas with beautiful country, rolling fields and low water crossings. 

I cannot remember the events of the accident that nearly killed me. After an impact to my head the next thing I remembered was waking up in an Austin hospital. I was told my car was upside down in a river and filling up with water when I was pulled out. If Sync had not dialed 911 I would certainly have perished at the bottom of that river."

David Hatton reading a letter from a Ford owner who benefited from SYNC 911 Assist®.

Your vehicle directly contacting 911 is a new standard in road safety — one that makes a lot of sense.

Before this system was developed, a 911 call would be directed through a call center before actually reaching a 911 operator. Anyone who has been in an emergency situation knows that can take time — time that, in some cases, can make all the difference.

Getting in a car wreck is an unexpected and scary experience. Anything that can get help where it's needed faster is a huge step in the right direction.

SYNC 911 Assist® is an inspiring example of how passionate people and companies can create technology that makes our lives better.​

Photo courtesy of Macy's
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Macy's and Girls Inc. believe that all girls deserve to be safe, supported, and valued. However, racial disparities continue to exist for young people when it comes to education levels, employment, and opportunities for growth. Add to that the gender divide, and it's clear to see why it's important for girls of color to have access to mentors who can equip them with the tools needed to navigate gender, economic, and social barriers.

Anissa Rivera is one of those mentors. Rivera is a recent Program Manager at the Long Island affiliate of Girls Inc., a nonprofit focusing on the holistic development of girls ages 5-18. The goal of the organization is to provide a safe space for girls to develop long-lasting mentoring relationships and build the skills, knowledge, and attitudes to thrive now and as adults.

Rivera spent years of her career working within the themes of self and community empowerment with young people — encouraging them to tap into their full potential. Her passion for youth development and female empowerment eventually led her to Girls Inc., where she served as an agent of positive change helping to inspire all girls to be strong, smart, and bold.

Photo courtesy of Macy's

Inspiring young women from all backgrounds is why Macy's has continued to partner with Girls Inc. for the second year in a row. The partnership will support mentoring programming that offers girls career readiness, college preparation, financial literacy, and more. Last year, Macy's raised over $1.3M for Girls Inc. in support of this program along with their Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) programming for more than 26,000 girls. Studies show that girls who participated are more likely than their peers to enjoy math and science, score higher on standardized math tests, and be more equipped for college and campus life.

Thanks to mentors like Rivera, girls across the country have the tools they need to excel in school and the confidence to change the world. With your help, we can give even more girls the opportunity to rise up. Throughout September 2021, customers can round up their in-store purchases or donate online to support Girls Inc. at Macys.com/MacysGives.

Who runs the world? Girls!

via Pixabay

Over the past six years, it feels like race relations have been on the decline in the U.S. We've lived through Donald Trump's appeals to America's racist underbelly. The nation has endured countless murders of unarmed Black people by police. We've also been bombarded with viral videos of people calling the police on people of color for simply going about their daily lives.

Earlier this year there was a series of incidents in which Asian-Americans were the targets of racist attacks inspired by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Given all that we've seen in the past half-decade, it makes sense for many to believe that race relations in the U.S. are on the decline.

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Photo courtesy of Macy's
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Did you know that girls who are encouraged to discover and develop their strengths tend to be more likely to achieve their goals? It's true. The question, however, is how to encourage girls to develop self-confidence and grow up healthy, educated, and independent.

The answer lies in Girls Inc., a national nonprofit serving girls ages 5-18 in more than 350 cities across North America. Since first forming in 1864 to serve girls and young women who were experiencing upheaval in the aftermath of the Civil War, they've been on a mission to inspire girls to kick butt and step into leadership roles — today and in the future.

This is why Macy's has committed to partnering with Girls Inc. and making it easy to support their mission. In a national campaign running throughout September 2021, customers can round up their in-store purchases to the nearest dollar or donate online to support Girls Inc. and empower girls throughout the country.


Kaylin St. Victor, a senior at Brentwood High School in New York, is one of those girls. She became involved in the Long Island affiliate of Girls Inc. when she was in 9th grade, quickly becoming a role model for her peers.

Photo courtesy of Macy's

Within her first year in the organization, she bravely took on speaking opportunities and participated in several summer programs focused on advocacy, leadership, and STEM (science, technology, engineering and math). "The women that I met each have a story that inspires me to become a better person than I was yesterday," said St. Victor. She credits her time at Girls Inc. with making her stronger and more comfortable in her own skin — confidence that directly translates to high achievement in education and the workforce.

In 2020, Macy's helped raise $1.3 million in support of their STEM and college and career readiness programming for more than 26,000 girls. In fact, according to a recent study, Girls Inc. girls are significantly more likely than their peers to enjoy math and science, to be interested in STEM careers, and to perform better on standardized math tests.

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